Anne Frank in South Africa: remembering the Holocaust during and after Apartheid


Gilbert, Shirli (2012) Anne Frank in South Africa: remembering the Holocaust during and after Apartheid Holocaust and Genocide Studies, 26, (3), pp. 366-393. (doi:10.1093/hgs/dcs058).

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Description/Abstract

Over the past six decades, South Africans have drawn on the symbol of Anne Frank in diverse ways in order to make sense of their own history and politics. The portrayal of Anne underwent several dramatic shifts during the apartheid period and after the transition to a non-racial political system, from a 1950s play foregrounding the young diarist's Jewishness to a 2009 exhibition promoting tolerance and democracy. Below, the author considers what such representations can tell us more broadly about how the legacy of Nazism informed understandings of and responses to apartheid, and explores how the Holocaust was appropriated for disparate political ends in the postwar world's quintessential racial state.

Item Type: Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): doi:10.1093/hgs/dcs058
ISSNs: 8756-6583 (print)
Subjects:

Organisations: History
ePrint ID: 204885
Date :
Date Event
2012Published
Date Deposited: 02 Dec 2011 14:53
Last Modified: 18 Apr 2017 01:07
Further Information:Google Scholar
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/204885

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