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Intracellular mineral grains in the xenophyophore Nazareammina tenera (Rhizaria, Foraminifera) from the Nazaré Canyon (Portuguese margin, NE Atlantic)

Intracellular mineral grains in the xenophyophore Nazareammina tenera (Rhizaria, Foraminifera) from the Nazaré Canyon (Portuguese margin, NE Atlantic)
Intracellular mineral grains in the xenophyophore Nazareammina tenera (Rhizaria, Foraminifera) from the Nazaré Canyon (Portuguese margin, NE Atlantic)
Xenophyophores, a group of large agglutinated foraminifera, are characterized by the presence of numerous intracellular barite grains, termed granellae, the function and origin of which is unclear. The recently described xenophyophore Nazareammina tenera (Gooday et al., in press), from abyssal depth (4300 m) in the Nazaré Canyon contains an unusually dense concentration of mineral grains in its cytoplasm. Uniquely among known xenophyophores, the intracellular grains in this species comprise a variety of different mineral types in addition to barite. They exhibit a wide range of morphologies and energy dispersive X-ray analysis indicated that they include Ti-bearing minerals, many of them rod-shaped (probably rutile), as well as those containing Fe and Ti (possibly ilmenite and anatase), and Al and Si (probably clay minerals). While the function of intracellular particles in xenophyophores remains unclear, the presence of numerous particles of various types in the cytoplasm suggests that they originate from the sediment. This suite of intracellular mineral grains is completely different from that used to construct the agglutinated test of N. tenera, suggesting that this species is able to discriminate between different kinds of particles. A second xenophyophore species, Reticulammina cerebreformis (Gooday et al., in press), which is abundant at the same site as N. tenera, is devoid of intracellular particles, suggesting that their presence in N. tenera is a species-specific characteristic.
Deep Sea, Benthos, Protists, Xenophyophorea, Agglutinated particles, Rutile, Granellae
0967-0637
1189-1195
Rothe, N.
c89f2da3-d68b-4a3a-9f96-d2212a8195b9
Gooday, A.J.
d9331d67-d518-4cfb-baed-9df3333b05b9
Pearce, R.B.
7d772b25-3ad0-4909-9a96-3a1a8111bc2f
Rothe, N.
c89f2da3-d68b-4a3a-9f96-d2212a8195b9
Gooday, A.J.
d9331d67-d518-4cfb-baed-9df3333b05b9
Pearce, R.B.
7d772b25-3ad0-4909-9a96-3a1a8111bc2f

Rothe, N., Gooday, A.J. and Pearce, R.B. (2011) Intracellular mineral grains in the xenophyophore Nazareammina tenera (Rhizaria, Foraminifera) from the Nazaré Canyon (Portuguese margin, NE Atlantic). Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers, 58 (12), 1189-1195. (doi:10.1016/j.dsr.2011.09.003).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Xenophyophores, a group of large agglutinated foraminifera, are characterized by the presence of numerous intracellular barite grains, termed granellae, the function and origin of which is unclear. The recently described xenophyophore Nazareammina tenera (Gooday et al., in press), from abyssal depth (4300 m) in the Nazaré Canyon contains an unusually dense concentration of mineral grains in its cytoplasm. Uniquely among known xenophyophores, the intracellular grains in this species comprise a variety of different mineral types in addition to barite. They exhibit a wide range of morphologies and energy dispersive X-ray analysis indicated that they include Ti-bearing minerals, many of them rod-shaped (probably rutile), as well as those containing Fe and Ti (possibly ilmenite and anatase), and Al and Si (probably clay minerals). While the function of intracellular particles in xenophyophores remains unclear, the presence of numerous particles of various types in the cytoplasm suggests that they originate from the sediment. This suite of intracellular mineral grains is completely different from that used to construct the agglutinated test of N. tenera, suggesting that this species is able to discriminate between different kinds of particles. A second xenophyophore species, Reticulammina cerebreformis (Gooday et al., in press), which is abundant at the same site as N. tenera, is devoid of intracellular particles, suggesting that their presence in N. tenera is a species-specific characteristic.

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More information

Published date: 2011
Keywords: Deep Sea, Benthos, Protists, Xenophyophorea, Agglutinated particles, Rutile, Granellae
Organisations: Marine Biogeochemistry, Paleooceanography & Palaeoclimate

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 206219
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/206219
ISSN: 0967-0637
PURE UUID: 34e8e955-45ac-4866-9538-e5bb9ec487c1

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Dec 2011 17:17
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 23:16

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