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Exploring data-related uncertainties in analyses of land area and population in the “Low-Elevation Coastal Zone” (LECZ)

Exploring data-related uncertainties in analyses of land area and population in the “Low-Elevation Coastal Zone” (LECZ)
Exploring data-related uncertainties in analyses of land area and population in the “Low-Elevation Coastal Zone” (LECZ)
Analyses of land area and population distribution in the Low Elevation Coastal Zone (LECZ) and their potential susceptibility to future sea level rise have been used to derive first-order assessments of areas and populations at risk. Variations in results are shown to be highly dependent on the input datasets. In this paper we explore differences in land and population distribution estimates in the LECZ resulting from the use of three digital elevation models and two population datasets at global, continent, and country levels.

Results at the global scale show differences of up to 150% in area estimates, depending on the elevation model used. The differences are most extreme below 1 m elevation and diminish at higher elevation increments. On the continent level, the use of different elevation models produced area estimate differences ranging from more than 1200% at an elevation of 1 m to 160% in the LECZ. Country-level differences are even higher. Similarly, substantial differences in population distribution can arise with the use of different population datasets. Population counts below 1 m elevation range from 1% to 2.3% of the total global population. In the LECZ, estimates vary from 9.2% to 10.9% of the total global population. Differences at continental and country levels are also significant depending on the elevation model and the population dataset used. These large differences indicate that results of such analyses should be regarded with caution and within the context of the methods and materials used
0749-0208
757 -768
Lichter, M.
df48e486-4125-40a8-9d93-70478ee4ff36
Vafeidis, A.T.
1822479b-7b92-432e-aab2-7c6f413d72e9
Nicholls, R.J.
4ce1e355-cc5d-4702-8124-820932c57076
Kaiser, G.
eafd54a8-6220-40d8-9bef-b06ba0f636f8
Lichter, M.
df48e486-4125-40a8-9d93-70478ee4ff36
Vafeidis, A.T.
1822479b-7b92-432e-aab2-7c6f413d72e9
Nicholls, R.J.
4ce1e355-cc5d-4702-8124-820932c57076
Kaiser, G.
eafd54a8-6220-40d8-9bef-b06ba0f636f8

Lichter, M., Vafeidis, A.T., Nicholls, R.J. and Kaiser, G. (2011) Exploring data-related uncertainties in analyses of land area and population in the “Low-Elevation Coastal Zone” (LECZ). Journal of Coastal Research, 27 (4), 757 -768. (doi:10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-10-00072.1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Analyses of land area and population distribution in the Low Elevation Coastal Zone (LECZ) and their potential susceptibility to future sea level rise have been used to derive first-order assessments of areas and populations at risk. Variations in results are shown to be highly dependent on the input datasets. In this paper we explore differences in land and population distribution estimates in the LECZ resulting from the use of three digital elevation models and two population datasets at global, continent, and country levels.

Results at the global scale show differences of up to 150% in area estimates, depending on the elevation model used. The differences are most extreme below 1 m elevation and diminish at higher elevation increments. On the continent level, the use of different elevation models produced area estimate differences ranging from more than 1200% at an elevation of 1 m to 160% in the LECZ. Country-level differences are even higher. Similarly, substantial differences in population distribution can arise with the use of different population datasets. Population counts below 1 m elevation range from 1% to 2.3% of the total global population. In the LECZ, estimates vary from 9.2% to 10.9% of the total global population. Differences at continental and country levels are also significant depending on the elevation model and the population dataset used. These large differences indicate that results of such analyses should be regarded with caution and within the context of the methods and materials used

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 5 October 2010
Published date: 2011
Organisations: Faculty of Engineering and the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 207319
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/207319
ISSN: 0749-0208
PURE UUID: f701d310-4748-4bd4-b7c1-c07c0f63468a
ORCID for R.J. Nicholls: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9715-1109

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Jan 2012 12:23
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:02

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Contributors

Author: M. Lichter
Author: A.T. Vafeidis
Author: R.J. Nicholls ORCID iD
Author: G. Kaiser

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