The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

A critical review of the UK household WEEE collection network

A critical review of the UK household WEEE collection network
A critical review of the UK household WEEE collection network
Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is one of the fastest growing UK waste streams. The UK WEEE Regulations prioritise waste prevention, reuse, recycling and recovery to minimise disposal of electronic products in landfill. This paper evaluates and discusses the UK collection network for household WEEE by analysing the operations of key stakeholders. The paper discusses the amount of wastes collected, how it is handled and processed. In UK urban areas, there are adequate facilities for the collection of unwanted appliances. In 2009, the UK surpassed collection targets for WEEE; by weight, the bulk of these were large household appliances, cooling appliances and display equipment. The majority of the collected waste was recycled with minor fractions reused. The core logistical problem facing the network is insufficient storage space for collecting unwanted appliances. The paper makes recommendations for consideration by policy- and strategy-makers in their appraisal of the collection network.
recycling & reuse of materials, sustainability, waste management & disposal, WEEE, waste collection
1747-6526
13-23
Ongondo, F.O.
1571ba26-fed2-42d9-a392-ad8fde1e6bbf
Williams, I.D.
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22
Ongondo, F.O.
1571ba26-fed2-42d9-a392-ad8fde1e6bbf
Williams, I.D.
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22

Ongondo, F.O. and Williams, I.D. (2012) A critical review of the UK household WEEE collection network. Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Waste and Resource Management, 165 (1), 13-23. (doi:10.1680/warm.2012.165.1.13).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is one of the fastest growing UK waste streams. The UK WEEE Regulations prioritise waste prevention, reuse, recycling and recovery to minimise disposal of electronic products in landfill. This paper evaluates and discusses the UK collection network for household WEEE by analysing the operations of key stakeholders. The paper discusses the amount of wastes collected, how it is handled and processed. In UK urban areas, there are adequate facilities for the collection of unwanted appliances. In 2009, the UK surpassed collection targets for WEEE; by weight, the bulk of these were large household appliances, cooling appliances and display equipment. The majority of the collected waste was recycled with minor fractions reused. The core logistical problem facing the network is insufficient storage space for collecting unwanted appliances. The paper makes recommendations for consideration by policy- and strategy-makers in their appraisal of the collection network.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 1 February 2012
Keywords: recycling & reuse of materials, sustainability, waste management & disposal, WEEE, waste collection
Organisations: Centre for Environmental Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 209337
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/209337
ISSN: 1747-6526
PURE UUID: df9c8cb3-1e33-4094-92be-c91edf83c720
ORCID for I.D. Williams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0121-1219

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Jan 2012 14:48
Last modified: 26 Nov 2019 01:46

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×