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Long term respiratory consequences of intrauterine growth restriction

Pike, Katharine, Pillow, J. Jane and Lucas, Jane S. (2012) Long term respiratory consequences of intrauterine growth restriction Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine, 17, (2), pp. 92-98. (doi:10.1016/j.siny.2012.01.003). (PMID:22277109).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Epidemiological studies demonstrate that in-utero growth restriction and low birth weight are associated with impaired lung function and increased respiratory morbidity from infancy, throughout childhood and into adulthood. Chronic restriction of nutrients and/or oxygen during late pregnancy causes abnormalities in the airways and lungs of offspring, including smaller numbers of enlarged alveoli with thicker septal walls and basement membranes. The structural abnormalities and impaired lung function seen soon after birth persist or even progress with age. These changes are likely to cause lung symptomology through life and hasten lung aging.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: January 2012
Published date: April 2012
Keywords: adult, fetal, intrauterine growth restriction, lung, lung function, lung maturation
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 209395
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/209395
PURE UUID: caf60d47-700d-41bc-b71d-e3896a6c61c1

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Jan 2012 14:22
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 10:47

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Contributors

Author: Katharine Pike
Author: J. Jane Pillow
Author: Jane S. Lucas

University divisions

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