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Finite element analysis of the implanted proximal tibia: A relationship between the initial cancellous bone stresses and implant migration

Finite element analysis of the implanted proximal tibia: A relationship between the initial cancellous bone stresses and implant migration
Finite element analysis of the implanted proximal tibia: A relationship between the initial cancellous bone stresses and implant migration
The cancellous bone stresses within the implanted proximal tibia were examined using a three-dimensional anatomical finite element model. Three versions of a proximal tibial prosthesis were examined: an all polyethylene press-fit design; a metal backed, stemmed press-fit design and a (horizontally) cemented metal backed, stemmed design. All three designs had published migration and survivorship data. The objectives of the study were (i) to compare the stresses generated by each of the tibial components, (ii) examine the influence of the resected surface morphology and (iii) compare the initial cancellous bone stresses with the published migration and survivorship data. The all polyethylene prosthesis generated the highest cancellous bone stresses. Addition of a metal backing and a stem reduced the stresses, but the cemented device produced the lowest cancellous bone stresses. The surface morphology had a significant effect on the cancellous bone stresses generated by press-fit prostheses. As the bone-prosthesis contact area decreased, the peak cancellous bone stresses increased by as much as 243%. The surface morphology had no effect on the cancellous bone stresses generated by the cemented implant. Good correlation was found between the predicted cancellous bone stresses and the migration and survivorship data, with the implant generating the highest cancellous bone stresses migrating the most and having the poorest survival rates at 5 year. The results support the hypothesis that the progressive failure of cancellous bone is a mechanism of implant migration regardless of the method of fixation and the implantation site.
FE analysis, migration, tibial prostheses
0021-9290
303-10
Taylor, M.
bdd7186d-4fda-4a39-bddb-9fcbbe25fcaa
Tanner, K.E.
729cbc48-ee64-4489-a149-40ad51bce240
Freeman, M.A.R.
0384b6e0-cdb1-4f89-b29c-c81827cb1085
Taylor, M.
bdd7186d-4fda-4a39-bddb-9fcbbe25fcaa
Tanner, K.E.
729cbc48-ee64-4489-a149-40ad51bce240
Freeman, M.A.R.
0384b6e0-cdb1-4f89-b29c-c81827cb1085

Taylor, M., Tanner, K.E. and Freeman, M.A.R. (1998) Finite element analysis of the implanted proximal tibia: A relationship between the initial cancellous bone stresses and implant migration. Journal of Biomechanics, 31 (4), 303-10. (doi:10.1016/S0021-9290(98)00022-0).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The cancellous bone stresses within the implanted proximal tibia were examined using a three-dimensional anatomical finite element model. Three versions of a proximal tibial prosthesis were examined: an all polyethylene press-fit design; a metal backed, stemmed press-fit design and a (horizontally) cemented metal backed, stemmed design. All three designs had published migration and survivorship data. The objectives of the study were (i) to compare the stresses generated by each of the tibial components, (ii) examine the influence of the resected surface morphology and (iii) compare the initial cancellous bone stresses with the published migration and survivorship data. The all polyethylene prosthesis generated the highest cancellous bone stresses. Addition of a metal backing and a stem reduced the stresses, but the cemented device produced the lowest cancellous bone stresses. The surface morphology had a significant effect on the cancellous bone stresses generated by press-fit prostheses. As the bone-prosthesis contact area decreased, the peak cancellous bone stresses increased by as much as 243%. The surface morphology had no effect on the cancellous bone stresses generated by the cemented implant. Good correlation was found between the predicted cancellous bone stresses and the migration and survivorship data, with the implant generating the highest cancellous bone stresses migrating the most and having the poorest survival rates at 5 year. The results support the hypothesis that the progressive failure of cancellous bone is a mechanism of implant migration regardless of the method of fixation and the implantation site.

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More information

Published date: 1998
Keywords: FE analysis, migration, tibial prostheses

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 21205
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/21205
ISSN: 0021-9290
PURE UUID: f63119d2-5a22-4bff-840d-fc84c5750dc3

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Date deposited: 05 May 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:24

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Contributors

Author: M. Taylor
Author: K.E. Tanner
Author: M.A.R. Freeman

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