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Design and performance of a high velocity air-sand jet impingement erosion facility

Design and performance of a high velocity air-sand jet impingement erosion facility
Design and performance of a high velocity air-sand jet impingement erosion facility
This paper describes the design, construction and capabilities of a high velocity air–sand erosion rig. It has been designed with the aid of computational fluid dynamics to approximately simulate the erosion conditions often experienced by subsea choke valves used in the offshore oil industry. It has also been designed to evaluate the erosion performance of CVD diamond coatings at sonic velocity. The rig is of the gas-blast design in which solid particles, typically sand 60–660 ?m in size, are injected into a high velocity air stream and accelerated down a 16-mm-diameter tube, 1 m in length, before striking the sample under test. Tests can be carried out with particle velocities of up to 340 m/s under a wide range of sand fluxes, impact angles and standoff distances. The results of pressure, velocity and sand flux calibration work are described. In addition, preliminary experimental data on tests carried out on mild steel, bulk and sprayed tungsten carbide are also presented. The flexibility of the air–sand rig allows the erosion behaviour of materials to be studied under a wide range of conditions.
air–sand erosion rig, high velocity, fluid dynamics
0043-1648
95-112
Wood, R.J.K.
8824ab38-4508-41d1-a5bb-2fe37931424a
Wheeler, D.W.
d276c145-56e0-48d0-ae37-a84dda92a947
Wood, R.J.K.
8824ab38-4508-41d1-a5bb-2fe37931424a
Wheeler, D.W.
d276c145-56e0-48d0-ae37-a84dda92a947

Wood, R.J.K. and Wheeler, D.W. (1998) Design and performance of a high velocity air-sand jet impingement erosion facility. Wear, 220 (2), 95-112. (doi:10.1016/S0043-1648(98)00196-3).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper describes the design, construction and capabilities of a high velocity air–sand erosion rig. It has been designed with the aid of computational fluid dynamics to approximately simulate the erosion conditions often experienced by subsea choke valves used in the offshore oil industry. It has also been designed to evaluate the erosion performance of CVD diamond coatings at sonic velocity. The rig is of the gas-blast design in which solid particles, typically sand 60–660 ?m in size, are injected into a high velocity air stream and accelerated down a 16-mm-diameter tube, 1 m in length, before striking the sample under test. Tests can be carried out with particle velocities of up to 340 m/s under a wide range of sand fluxes, impact angles and standoff distances. The results of pressure, velocity and sand flux calibration work are described. In addition, preliminary experimental data on tests carried out on mild steel, bulk and sprayed tungsten carbide are also presented. The flexibility of the air–sand rig allows the erosion behaviour of materials to be studied under a wide range of conditions.

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More information

Published date: 1998
Keywords: air–sand erosion rig, high velocity, fluid dynamics

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 21219
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/21219
ISSN: 0043-1648
PURE UUID: 9dcb9140-7de0-4924-ae0e-2dda0c0b638c

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Nov 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:24

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