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Contact mechanics

Contact mechanics
Contact mechanics
Contact problems are central to Solid Mechanics, because contact is the principal method of applying loads to a deformable body and the resulting stress concentration is often the most critical point in the body. Contact is characterized by unilateral inequalities, describing the physical impossibility of tensile contact tractions (except under special circumstances) and of material interpenetration. Additional inequalities and/or non-linearities are introduced when friction laws are taken into account. These complex boundary conditions can lead to problems with existence and uniqueness of quasi-static solution and to lack of convergence of numerical algorithms. In frictional problems, there can also be lack of stability, leading to stick–slip motion and frictional vibrations.
If the material is non-linear, the solution of contact problems is greatly complicated, but recent work has shown that indentation of a power-law material by a power law punch is self-similar, even in the presence of friction, so that the complete history of loading in such cases can be described by the (usually numerical) solution of a single problem.
Real contacting surfaces are rough, leading to the concentration of contact in a cluster of microscopic actual contact areas. This affects the conduction of heat and electricity across the interface as well as the mechanical contact process. Adequate description of such systems requires a random process or statistical treatment and recent results suggest that surfaces possess fractal properties that can be used to obtain a more efficient mathematical characterization.
Contact problems are very sensitive to minor profile changes in the contacting bodies and hence are also affected by thermoelastic distortion. Important applications include cases where non-uniform temperatures are associated with frictional heating or the conduction of heat across a non-uniform interface. The resulting coupled thermomechanical problem can be unstable, leading to a rich range of physical phenomena.
Other recent developments are also briefly surveyed, including examples of anisotropic materials, elastodynamic problems and fretting fatigue.
0020-7683
29-43
Barber, J.R.
af9edfeb-4ab0-4c9a-9974-12f1e993e10b
Ciavarella, M.
d5aa6350-b3d4-4a78-a670-9d78242f58c5
Barber, J.R.
af9edfeb-4ab0-4c9a-9974-12f1e993e10b
Ciavarella, M.
d5aa6350-b3d4-4a78-a670-9d78242f58c5

Barber, J.R. and Ciavarella, M. (2000) Contact mechanics. International Journal of Solids and Structures, 37 (1-2), 29-43. (doi:10.1016/S0020-7683(99)00075-X).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Contact problems are central to Solid Mechanics, because contact is the principal method of applying loads to a deformable body and the resulting stress concentration is often the most critical point in the body. Contact is characterized by unilateral inequalities, describing the physical impossibility of tensile contact tractions (except under special circumstances) and of material interpenetration. Additional inequalities and/or non-linearities are introduced when friction laws are taken into account. These complex boundary conditions can lead to problems with existence and uniqueness of quasi-static solution and to lack of convergence of numerical algorithms. In frictional problems, there can also be lack of stability, leading to stick–slip motion and frictional vibrations.
If the material is non-linear, the solution of contact problems is greatly complicated, but recent work has shown that indentation of a power-law material by a power law punch is self-similar, even in the presence of friction, so that the complete history of loading in such cases can be described by the (usually numerical) solution of a single problem.
Real contacting surfaces are rough, leading to the concentration of contact in a cluster of microscopic actual contact areas. This affects the conduction of heat and electricity across the interface as well as the mechanical contact process. Adequate description of such systems requires a random process or statistical treatment and recent results suggest that surfaces possess fractal properties that can be used to obtain a more efficient mathematical characterization.
Contact problems are very sensitive to minor profile changes in the contacting bodies and hence are also affected by thermoelastic distortion. Important applications include cases where non-uniform temperatures are associated with frictional heating or the conduction of heat across a non-uniform interface. The resulting coupled thermomechanical problem can be unstable, leading to a rich range of physical phenomena.
Other recent developments are also briefly surveyed, including examples of anisotropic materials, elastodynamic problems and fretting fatigue.

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More information

Published date: 2000
Additional Information: Special issue: Recent Trends in Solid Mechanics edited by Professor Dvorak

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 21412
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/21412
ISSN: 0020-7683
PURE UUID: 88876f29-e866-4567-8e5d-4a722ddb2438

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Date deposited: 06 Feb 2007
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 16:26

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