The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Modelling in the design of a flow-through ultrasonic separator

Modelling in the design of a flow-through ultrasonic separator
Modelling in the design of a flow-through ultrasonic separator
This paper describes the design and testing of a flow-through ultrasonic separation device that allows the concentration of particles within a fluid. The device operates without the use of an acoustically transparent element. Three models are used to examine the behaviour of the cell, dealing with acoustic–particle interaction, electro-acoustic characteristics, and fluid flow. The device is able to concentrate up to 84% of the 60 ?m sand particles in the ‘dirty’ stream, 13% in the intermediate stream and 3% in the ‘clean’ stream. Flow rates of up to 20 l h?1 (equating to an inlet velocity of 10?2 m s?1) have been used with an electrical power input of up to 50 W (10 kW m?1)
equivalent circuit modelling, transducer modelling, ultrasonic separation
0041-624X
662-665
Hill, M.
0cda65c8-a70f-476f-b126-d2c4460a253e
Wood, R.J.K.
d9523d31-41a8-459a-8831-70e29ffe8a73
Hill, M.
0cda65c8-a70f-476f-b126-d2c4460a253e
Wood, R.J.K.
d9523d31-41a8-459a-8831-70e29ffe8a73

Hill, M. and Wood, R.J.K. (2000) Modelling in the design of a flow-through ultrasonic separator. Ultrasonics, 38 (1-8), 662-665. (doi:10.1016/S0041-624X(99)00134-1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper describes the design and testing of a flow-through ultrasonic separation device that allows the concentration of particles within a fluid. The device operates without the use of an acoustically transparent element. Three models are used to examine the behaviour of the cell, dealing with acoustic–particle interaction, electro-acoustic characteristics, and fluid flow. The device is able to concentrate up to 84% of the 60 ?m sand particles in the ‘dirty’ stream, 13% in the intermediate stream and 3% in the ‘clean’ stream. Flow rates of up to 20 l h?1 (equating to an inlet velocity of 10?2 m s?1) have been used with an electrical power input of up to 50 W (10 kW m?1)

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2000
Keywords: equivalent circuit modelling, transducer modelling, ultrasonic separation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 21454
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/21454
ISSN: 0041-624X
PURE UUID: 0731630b-96fa-408d-8779-5cd70f6e8ea4
ORCID for M. Hill: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6448-9448
ORCID for R.J.K. Wood: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0681-9239

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Feb 2007
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:12

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×