The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Development of sensor technology to facilitate in-situ measurement of damage in composite materials for spacecraft applications

Development of sensor technology to facilitate in-situ measurement of damage in composite materials for spacecraft applications
Development of sensor technology to facilitate in-situ measurement of damage in composite materials for spacecraft applications
Spacecraft inhabit an environment, which presents many hazards to their structural integrity and continued operation, and are intrinsically expensive to repair. Naturally-occurring micrometeoroids and debris from previous missions can both produce significant impact damage, particularly in advanced materials such as carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP). A sensor capable of recording impact events, and measuring the extent of the damage caused, would therefore be a useful tool in minimizing the risks and cost of spacecraft operation. This paper considers the use of multiplexed optical fiber Bragg grating based sensors for use in this application. It is envisaged that sensors should be used to optimize replacement schedules and prevent service failure. The interrogation systems have been developed as collaborative research between the Optoelectronics Research Centre and the Department of Engineering Materials at the University of Southampton, also involving a number of external collaborators (including ESA, and, in the UK, the following: DERA, Sensor Dynamics, NERC, and DTI). We utilize superluminescent erbium doped fibers as the light source and an acousto-optic-tuneable filter (AOTF) as the wavelength-selective element. Our latest developments in interrogation technology result in the creation of a high speed, high-resolution multiplexed sensor. This technology shows promise for assessing impact damage caused by low, high and hypervelocity impacts. The potential for counting and characterization of impinging particles from strain sensor readings (both transient and residual) is discussed.
0819439088
Mowlem, Matthew C.
6f633ca2-298f-48ee-a025-ce52dd62124f
Chambers, Alan
74fa9b7e-6362-478e-a038-15f2828c5446
Dakin, John P.
04891b9b-5fb5-4245-879e-9e7361adf904
Wilson, Alan R.
ade24d81-2561-416a-b629-09828bae3f22
Asanuma, Hiroshi
1a6e8ea5-aeb8-4e4b-a021-792e9cf49c54
Mowlem, Matthew C.
6f633ca2-298f-48ee-a025-ce52dd62124f
Chambers, Alan
74fa9b7e-6362-478e-a038-15f2828c5446
Dakin, John P.
04891b9b-5fb5-4245-879e-9e7361adf904
Wilson, Alan R.
ade24d81-2561-416a-b629-09828bae3f22
Asanuma, Hiroshi
1a6e8ea5-aeb8-4e4b-a021-792e9cf49c54

Mowlem, Matthew C., Chambers, Alan and Dakin, John P. (2000) Development of sensor technology to facilitate in-situ measurement of damage in composite materials for spacecraft applications. Wilson, Alan R. and Asanuma, Hiroshi (eds.) SPIE 4234 : Smart Materials. 13 - 15 Dec 2000. (doi:10.1117/12.424400).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Spacecraft inhabit an environment, which presents many hazards to their structural integrity and continued operation, and are intrinsically expensive to repair. Naturally-occurring micrometeoroids and debris from previous missions can both produce significant impact damage, particularly in advanced materials such as carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP). A sensor capable of recording impact events, and measuring the extent of the damage caused, would therefore be a useful tool in minimizing the risks and cost of spacecraft operation. This paper considers the use of multiplexed optical fiber Bragg grating based sensors for use in this application. It is envisaged that sensors should be used to optimize replacement schedules and prevent service failure. The interrogation systems have been developed as collaborative research between the Optoelectronics Research Centre and the Department of Engineering Materials at the University of Southampton, also involving a number of external collaborators (including ESA, and, in the UK, the following: DERA, Sensor Dynamics, NERC, and DTI). We utilize superluminescent erbium doped fibers as the light source and an acousto-optic-tuneable filter (AOTF) as the wavelength-selective element. Our latest developments in interrogation technology result in the creation of a high speed, high-resolution multiplexed sensor. This technology shows promise for assessing impact damage caused by low, high and hypervelocity impacts. The potential for counting and characterization of impinging particles from strain sensor readings (both transient and residual) is discussed.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 2000
Venue - Dates: SPIE 4234 : Smart Materials, 2000-12-13 - 2000-12-15

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 21895
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/21895
ISBN: 0819439088
PURE UUID: 23b81628-91d0-4ecc-905d-e43c8cdcf141

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Mar 2007
Last modified: 05 Dec 2018 17:34

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Matthew C. Mowlem
Author: Alan Chambers
Author: John P. Dakin
Editor: Alan R. Wilson
Editor: Hiroshi Asanuma

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×