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Design of a 100kVA high temperature superconducting demonstration synchronous generator

Design of a 100kVA high temperature superconducting demonstration synchronous generator
Design of a 100kVA high temperature superconducting demonstration synchronous generator
The paper presents the main features of a 100 kVA high temperature superconducting (HTS) demonstrator generator, which is designed and being built at the University of Southampton. The generator is a 2-pole synchronous machine with a conventional 3-phase stator and a HTS rotor operating in the temperature range 57–77 K using either liquid nitrogen down to 65 K or liquid air down to 57 K. Liquid air has not been used before in the refrigeration of HTS devices but has recently been commercialised by BOC as a safe alternative to nitrogen for use in freezing of food. The generator will use an existing stator with a bore of 330 mm. The rotor is designed with a magnetic core (invar) to reduce the magnetising current and the field in the coils. For ease of manufacture, a hybrid salient pole construction is used, and the superconducting winding consists of twelve 50-turn identical flat coils. Magnetic invar rings will be used between adjacent HTS coils of the winding to divert the normal component of the magnetic field away from the Bi2223 superconducting tapes. To avoid excessive eddy-current losses in the rotor pole faces, a cold copper screen will be placed around the rotor core to exclude ac magnetic fields.
high temperature superconducting generator, ac applications, high temperature superconductors, superconducting power devices
0921-4534
1539-1542
Al-Mosawi, M.K.
650b2475-f20f-4d8f-948c-1e28863b10dc
Beduz, C.
2cbc6ece-3e8b-454b-86d6-3960596bd234
Goddard, K.
fe2a2194-8b55-43c1-bdca-341691b71b2d
Sykulski, J.K.
d6885caf-aaed-4d12-9ef3-46c4c3bbd7fb
Yang, Y.
4cac858a-e0c0-4174-a839-05ca394fc51f
Xu, B.
0dbc6d06-8855-489e-8b0a-7aea092b1705
Ship, K.S.
6079b0d9-cb6f-477d-912d-9c347dc64ba8
Stoll, R.
8c570d0e-23fa-444c-8e2b-f98ccba79e90
Stephen, N.G.
af39d0e9-b190-421d-86fe-28b793d5bca3
Al-Mosawi, M.K.
650b2475-f20f-4d8f-948c-1e28863b10dc
Beduz, C.
2cbc6ece-3e8b-454b-86d6-3960596bd234
Goddard, K.
fe2a2194-8b55-43c1-bdca-341691b71b2d
Sykulski, J.K.
d6885caf-aaed-4d12-9ef3-46c4c3bbd7fb
Yang, Y.
4cac858a-e0c0-4174-a839-05ca394fc51f
Xu, B.
0dbc6d06-8855-489e-8b0a-7aea092b1705
Ship, K.S.
6079b0d9-cb6f-477d-912d-9c347dc64ba8
Stoll, R.
8c570d0e-23fa-444c-8e2b-f98ccba79e90
Stephen, N.G.
af39d0e9-b190-421d-86fe-28b793d5bca3

Al-Mosawi, M.K., Beduz, C., Goddard, K., Sykulski, J.K., Yang, Y., Xu, B., Ship, K.S., Stoll, R. and Stephen, N.G. (2002) Design of a 100kVA high temperature superconducting demonstration synchronous generator Physica C: Superconductivity And its Applications, 372-376, (3), pp. 1539-1542.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The paper presents the main features of a 100 kVA high temperature superconducting (HTS) demonstrator generator, which is designed and being built at the University of Southampton. The generator is a 2-pole synchronous machine with a conventional 3-phase stator and a HTS rotor operating in the temperature range 57–77 K using either liquid nitrogen down to 65 K or liquid air down to 57 K. Liquid air has not been used before in the refrigeration of HTS devices but has recently been commercialised by BOC as a safe alternative to nitrogen for use in freezing of food. The generator will use an existing stator with a bore of 330 mm. The rotor is designed with a magnetic core (invar) to reduce the magnetising current and the field in the coils. For ease of manufacture, a hybrid salient pole construction is used, and the superconducting winding consists of twelve 50-turn identical flat coils. Magnetic invar rings will be used between adjacent HTS coils of the winding to divert the normal component of the magnetic field away from the Bi2223 superconducting tapes. To avoid excessive eddy-current losses in the rotor pole faces, a cold copper screen will be placed around the rotor core to exclude ac magnetic fields.

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More information

Submitted date: 26 August 2001
Published date: 1 August 2002
Additional Information: This is the first of two papers presenting our outstanding and internationally leading research work in the field of power applications of high temperature superconductors (HTS). At Southampton University, we have designed and build the world first liquid nitrogen cooled HTS generator with novel technological design features. We presented some of the work undertaken to select and optimize suitable materials and configurations to be used in the design and manufacture of the machine. Cited 6 times (1 in 2005, 5 in 2004). Grade 3
Keywords: high temperature superconducting generator, ac applications, high temperature superconductors, superconducting power devices

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 22101
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/22101
ISSN: 0921-4534
PURE UUID: 79c86266-ff10-40de-bc1a-88e98d7a6486
ORCID for J.K. Sykulski: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6392-126X
ORCID for Y. Yang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3874-6735

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Mar 2006
Last modified: 09 Oct 2017 07:27

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Contributors

Author: M.K. Al-Mosawi
Author: C. Beduz
Author: K. Goddard
Author: J.K. Sykulski ORCID iD
Author: Y. Yang ORCID iD
Author: B. Xu
Author: K.S. Ship
Author: R. Stoll
Author: N.G. Stephen

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