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Relationship between cycles to failure and the rate of damage and creep in fatigue tests of human cortical bone

Relationship between cycles to failure and the rate of damage and creep in fatigue tests of human cortical bone
Relationship between cycles to failure and the rate of damage and creep in fatigue tests of human cortical bone
The fatigue failure of bone has been implicated in a number of pathologies. Both implant design and clinical assessment would be enhanced by the ability to simulate fatigue failure. Like most materials, bone exhibits a decreasing fatigue life with increasing stress. During fatigue, bone also creeps and loses stiffness. The adequate characterization of all of these effects is necessary for finite element simulations of fatigue failure.
Using human cortical bone samples, many authors have studied fatigue life as a function of applied stress [e.g. 1,2,3]. Loss of stiffness (typically Young’s modulus) due to fatigue has also been studied [2,3], as has creep [4].
Here we present the results of fatigue tests of cortical bone samples taken from four individuals. Samples were tested in tensile fatigue until failure. Unlike earlier works examining the cumulative modulus loss, we find the rate of stiffness loss, which is fairly constant over the majority of the fatigue life. We will present data of applied maximum stress, cycles to failure, rate of modulus loss, and creep rate.
209-210
Cotton, John R.
35dc9802-8e9b-46cd-9a33-7763594da9b8
Winwood, Keith
caff2698-6503-4bdf-beab-20b4bc82f214
Zioupos, Peter
70120765-7396-4e86-bb9e-9c4d64c43294
Taylor, Mark
e368bda3-6ca5-4178-80e9-41a689badeeb
Cotton, John R.
35dc9802-8e9b-46cd-9a33-7763594da9b8
Winwood, Keith
caff2698-6503-4bdf-beab-20b4bc82f214
Zioupos, Peter
70120765-7396-4e86-bb9e-9c4d64c43294
Taylor, Mark
e368bda3-6ca5-4178-80e9-41a689badeeb

Cotton, John R., Winwood, Keith, Zioupos, Peter and Taylor, Mark (2003) Relationship between cycles to failure and the rate of damage and creep in fatigue tests of human cortical bone. ASME Summer Bioengineering Conference. 25 - 29 Jun 2003. pp. 209-210 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The fatigue failure of bone has been implicated in a number of pathologies. Both implant design and clinical assessment would be enhanced by the ability to simulate fatigue failure. Like most materials, bone exhibits a decreasing fatigue life with increasing stress. During fatigue, bone also creeps and loses stiffness. The adequate characterization of all of these effects is necessary for finite element simulations of fatigue failure.
Using human cortical bone samples, many authors have studied fatigue life as a function of applied stress [e.g. 1,2,3]. Loss of stiffness (typically Young’s modulus) due to fatigue has also been studied [2,3], as has creep [4].
Here we present the results of fatigue tests of cortical bone samples taken from four individuals. Samples were tested in tensile fatigue until failure. Unlike earlier works examining the cumulative modulus loss, we find the rate of stiffness loss, which is fairly constant over the majority of the fatigue life. We will present data of applied maximum stress, cycles to failure, rate of modulus loss, and creep rate.

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More information

Published date: 2003
Venue - Dates: ASME Summer Bioengineering Conference, 2003-06-25 - 2003-06-29

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Local EPrints ID: 22649
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/22649
PURE UUID: c738e5c4-fac5-4f5e-b848-04d541f6c382

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Date deposited: 02 Jun 2006
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 16:21

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Contributors

Author: John R. Cotton
Author: Keith Winwood
Author: Peter Zioupos
Author: Mark Taylor

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