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Materials selection in micromechanical design: an application of the Ashby approach

Materials selection in micromechanical design: an application of the Ashby approach
Materials selection in micromechanical design: an application of the Ashby approach
The set of materials available to microsystems designers is rapidly expanding. Techniques now exist to introduce and integrate a large number of metals, alloys, ceramics, glasses, polymers, and elastomers into microsystems, motivating the need for a rational approach for materials selection in microsystems design. As a step toward such an approach, we focus on the initial stages of materials selection for micromechanical structures with minimum feature sizes greater than 1 /spl mu/m. The variation of mechanical properties with length scale and processing parameters is discussed. Bounds for initial design values of several properties are suggested and the necessity for the measurement of other properties (especially residual stresses and intrinsic loss coefficients) is discussed. Adapting the methods pioneered by Ashby et al., materials indices are formulated for a number of properties and materials selection charts are presented. These concepts are applied to illustrate initial materials selection for shock-resistant microbeams, force sensors, micromechanical filters, and micromachined flexures. Issues associated with the integration of materials into microsystems are briefly discussed.
1057-7157
3-10
Srikar, V.T.
168310a0-86f6-405e-8b9f-5c995cb5f238
Spearing, S.M.
9e56a7b3-e0e8-47b1-a6b4-db676ed3c17a
Srikar, V.T.
168310a0-86f6-405e-8b9f-5c995cb5f238
Spearing, S.M.
9e56a7b3-e0e8-47b1-a6b4-db676ed3c17a

Srikar, V.T. and Spearing, S.M. (2003) Materials selection in micromechanical design: an application of the Ashby approach. Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, 12 (1), 3-10. (doi:10.1109/JMEMS.2002.807466).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The set of materials available to microsystems designers is rapidly expanding. Techniques now exist to introduce and integrate a large number of metals, alloys, ceramics, glasses, polymers, and elastomers into microsystems, motivating the need for a rational approach for materials selection in microsystems design. As a step toward such an approach, we focus on the initial stages of materials selection for micromechanical structures with minimum feature sizes greater than 1 /spl mu/m. The variation of mechanical properties with length scale and processing parameters is discussed. Bounds for initial design values of several properties are suggested and the necessity for the measurement of other properties (especially residual stresses and intrinsic loss coefficients) is discussed. Adapting the methods pioneered by Ashby et al., materials indices are formulated for a number of properties and materials selection charts are presented. These concepts are applied to illustrate initial materials selection for shock-resistant microbeams, force sensors, micromechanical filters, and micromachined flexures. Issues associated with the integration of materials into microsystems are briefly discussed.

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Published date: 2003

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 22785
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/22785
ISSN: 1057-7157
PURE UUID: 94f7a74d-ca45-4bdd-a016-2dab4c6d039f
ORCID for S.M. Spearing: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3059-2014

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Date deposited: 10 Mar 2006
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:48

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