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Fatigue damage in titanium-graphite hybrid laminates

Fatigue damage in titanium-graphite hybrid laminates
Fatigue damage in titanium-graphite hybrid laminates
Hybrid laminates could become an enabling technology for future high-temperature, low mass fraction aerospace vehicles. However, since they are a relatively new material technology, the key damage modes need to be characterized in order to guide material development and structural design. In this paper, results are presented for high temperature, tension-compression fatigue tests performed on TiGr laminates containing open holes. Fatigue life data was collected for specimens at several percentages of open hole tension strength. The key damage modes were identified as 0° ply splitting, facesheet cracking and facesheet delamination. Comparison between the splits in TiGr and similar splitting observed in 0°/90° cross-ply PMC laminates showed that initiation in both materials was similar in extent. Delamination was identified as the dominant damage mode causing stiffness reduction. Stiffness measurements were taken during fatigue cycling and were correlated with previously developed modeling results. The model was able to capture the stiffness reduction trends for multiple applied stress levels with the use of a tuning factor.
hybrid composites, modelling, fatigue crack
0266-3538
607-617
Burianek, Dennis A.
6dd8b685-86ee-493d-8992-709fb7a5a6e7
Spearing, S. Mark
9e56a7b3-e0e8-47b1-a6b4-db676ed3c17a
Burianek, Dennis A.
6dd8b685-86ee-493d-8992-709fb7a5a6e7
Spearing, S. Mark
9e56a7b3-e0e8-47b1-a6b4-db676ed3c17a

Burianek, Dennis A. and Spearing, S. Mark (2002) Fatigue damage in titanium-graphite hybrid laminates. Composites Science and Technology, 62 (5), 607-617. (doi:10.1016/S0266-3538(02)00027-1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Hybrid laminates could become an enabling technology for future high-temperature, low mass fraction aerospace vehicles. However, since they are a relatively new material technology, the key damage modes need to be characterized in order to guide material development and structural design. In this paper, results are presented for high temperature, tension-compression fatigue tests performed on TiGr laminates containing open holes. Fatigue life data was collected for specimens at several percentages of open hole tension strength. The key damage modes were identified as 0° ply splitting, facesheet cracking and facesheet delamination. Comparison between the splits in TiGr and similar splitting observed in 0°/90° cross-ply PMC laminates showed that initiation in both materials was similar in extent. Delamination was identified as the dominant damage mode causing stiffness reduction. Stiffness measurements were taken during fatigue cycling and were correlated with previously developed modeling results. The model was able to capture the stiffness reduction trends for multiple applied stress levels with the use of a tuning factor.

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More information

Published date: 2002
Keywords: hybrid composites, modelling, fatigue crack

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 23076
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/23076
ISSN: 0266-3538
PURE UUID: abd57821-4e31-40b7-ae39-5b9415f8af9f
ORCID for S. Mark Spearing: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3059-2014

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Mar 2006
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:45

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