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Improvement of ventilation flow inside a large factory building using PIV velocity field measurements

Improvement of ventilation flow inside a large factory building using PIV velocity field measurements
Improvement of ventilation flow inside a large factory building using PIV velocity field measurements
Air movement in workplaces, whether resulting from a forced ventilation system or natural airflow, has a significant impact on occupational health. In a huge building of shipbuilding factory, typical harmful factors such as fume or vaporized gas from welding and cutting of steel plates give an unpleasant feeling. From field data survey, the yearly dominant wind directions around the factory building tested were north-west, north-east and south-east. Among the three wind directions, the ventilation improvement was the worst for the north-eastern wind. This study was focused on modification of opening vents in order to utilize the natural ventilation flow effectively. Instantaneous velocity fields inside the 1/1000 scale-down factory building model were measured using a 2-frame cross-correlation PIV method. The factory model was embedded in an atmospheric boundary layer simulated in a wind tunnel. The modified vents improved the internal ventilation flow with increasing the flow speed more than two times, compared with that of present vents.
natural ventilation, wind tunnel, atmospheric boundary layer, PIV, velocity field
67-76
Lee, S.J.
f7182411-e727-492f-a4b5-824128a74f4c
Lim, H.C.
4613ec91-0a5c-4b90-ab19-12232c50af2c
Kim, H.B.
0d1c79bc-0ce1-4532-89f6-d13a3534f35d
Lee, S.J.
f7182411-e727-492f-a4b5-824128a74f4c
Lim, H.C.
4613ec91-0a5c-4b90-ab19-12232c50af2c
Kim, H.B.
0d1c79bc-0ce1-4532-89f6-d13a3534f35d

Lee, S.J., Lim, H.C. and Kim, H.B. (2002) Improvement of ventilation flow inside a large factory building using PIV velocity field measurements. Journal of Visualization, 5 (1), 67-76.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Air movement in workplaces, whether resulting from a forced ventilation system or natural airflow, has a significant impact on occupational health. In a huge building of shipbuilding factory, typical harmful factors such as fume or vaporized gas from welding and cutting of steel plates give an unpleasant feeling. From field data survey, the yearly dominant wind directions around the factory building tested were north-west, north-east and south-east. Among the three wind directions, the ventilation improvement was the worst for the north-eastern wind. This study was focused on modification of opening vents in order to utilize the natural ventilation flow effectively. Instantaneous velocity fields inside the 1/1000 scale-down factory building model were measured using a 2-frame cross-correlation PIV method. The factory model was embedded in an atmospheric boundary layer simulated in a wind tunnel. The modified vents improved the internal ventilation flow with increasing the flow speed more than two times, compared with that of present vents.

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More information

Published date: 2002
Keywords: natural ventilation, wind tunnel, atmospheric boundary layer, PIV, velocity field

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 23494
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/23494
PURE UUID: eb8d6df6-73d7-4f6c-864c-8f31efa794a3

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Mar 2006
Last modified: 06 Oct 2020 23:43

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Contributors

Author: S.J. Lee
Author: H.C. Lim
Author: H.B. Kim

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