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Factors contributing to creep strengthening in discontinuously-reinforced materials

Factors contributing to creep strengthening in discontinuously-reinforced materials
Factors contributing to creep strengthening in discontinuously-reinforced materials
There have been several experimental investigations of the creep behavior of materials with discontinuous reinforcement. For these materials, logarithmic plots of the steady-state or minimum strain rate against the applied stress usually reveal significant curvature such that the stress exponent, determined from the slope of the line, increases with decreasing stress. Plots of this nature are usually interpreted by invoking a threshold stress, ?o and replacing the applied stress, ?, with an effective stress, defined as (???o). This paper examines the implications of this approach using published creep data for several aluminum-based materials. It is shown that the introduction of an effective stress leads to a stress exponent that is similar to that observed in the unreinforced matrix material but, nevertheless, the creep rates in the reinforced materials are often significantly slower than in the matrix. This difference is examined with reference to the occurrence of load transfer and substructure strengthening.
composites, creep, load transfer, substructure strengthening, threshold stress
0921-5093
73-78
Han, Bing Q.
4e40aee4-e7be-4058-a3b3-31750ef8b354
Langdon, Terence G.
86e69b4f-e16d-4830-bf8a-5a9c11f0de86
Han, Bing Q.
4e40aee4-e7be-4058-a3b3-31750ef8b354
Langdon, Terence G.
86e69b4f-e16d-4830-bf8a-5a9c11f0de86

Han, Bing Q. and Langdon, Terence G. (2002) Factors contributing to creep strengthening in discontinuously-reinforced materials. Materials Science and Engineering: A, 322 (1-2), 73-78. (doi:10.1016/S0921-5093(01)01119-4).

Record type: Article

Abstract

There have been several experimental investigations of the creep behavior of materials with discontinuous reinforcement. For these materials, logarithmic plots of the steady-state or minimum strain rate against the applied stress usually reveal significant curvature such that the stress exponent, determined from the slope of the line, increases with decreasing stress. Plots of this nature are usually interpreted by invoking a threshold stress, ?o and replacing the applied stress, ?, with an effective stress, defined as (???o). This paper examines the implications of this approach using published creep data for several aluminum-based materials. It is shown that the introduction of an effective stress leads to a stress exponent that is similar to that observed in the unreinforced matrix material but, nevertheless, the creep rates in the reinforced materials are often significantly slower than in the matrix. This difference is examined with reference to the occurrence of load transfer and substructure strengthening.

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More information

Published date: 2002
Keywords: composites, creep, load transfer, substructure strengthening, threshold stress
Organisations: Engineering Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 23856
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/23856
ISSN: 0921-5093
PURE UUID: 3b155d8a-206b-4c0b-901e-30c4060a2b37
ORCID for Terence G. Langdon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3541-9250

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Mar 2006
Last modified: 19 Nov 2019 01:49

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