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Anti-apostatic selection by wild birds on quasi-natural morphs of the land snail Cepaea hortensis: a generalised linear mixed models approach

Anti-apostatic selection by wild birds on quasi-natural morphs of the land snail Cepaea hortensis: a generalised linear mixed models approach
Anti-apostatic selection by wild birds on quasi-natural morphs of the land snail Cepaea hortensis: a generalised linear mixed models approach
Anti-apostatic selection occurs when predators feed disproportionately on rare prey, a process that leads to a decrease in variation within prey populations. Most of the evidence for this phenomenon comes from experiments using artificial prey items distinguished by simple artificial colour differences. We describe an experiment performed at 10 different sites in which we tested whether selection by wild birds is anti-apostatic when presented with high density populations of shells of the polymorphic land snail, Cepaea hortensis, stuffed with pastry. At each site we presented two sorts of populations in sequence: 45 yellow unbanded with 5 yellow banded, and 5 yellow unbanded with 45 yellow banded. Selection was measured using an analysis based on generalised linear mixed models (GLMMs) that has broad applicability to all resource selection studies where extraneous variance is a problem. Using this analytic method, we found that birds altered their behaviour to produce significant anti-apostatic selection in direct response to changes in frequency of the quasi-natural Cepaea morphs.
0030-1299
335-343
Allen, J.A.
2a40d9b5-1464-42f0-86c1-69ebb24ea05f
Weale, M.E.
d1c20288-848d-45d4-974f-fbdd68829a39
Allen, J.A.
2a40d9b5-1464-42f0-86c1-69ebb24ea05f
Weale, M.E.
d1c20288-848d-45d4-974f-fbdd68829a39

Allen, J.A. and Weale, M.E. (2005) Anti-apostatic selection by wild birds on quasi-natural morphs of the land snail Cepaea hortensis: a generalised linear mixed models approach. Oikos, 108 (2), 335-343. (doi:10.1111/j.0030-1299.2005.12523.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Anti-apostatic selection occurs when predators feed disproportionately on rare prey, a process that leads to a decrease in variation within prey populations. Most of the evidence for this phenomenon comes from experiments using artificial prey items distinguished by simple artificial colour differences. We describe an experiment performed at 10 different sites in which we tested whether selection by wild birds is anti-apostatic when presented with high density populations of shells of the polymorphic land snail, Cepaea hortensis, stuffed with pastry. At each site we presented two sorts of populations in sequence: 45 yellow unbanded with 5 yellow banded, and 5 yellow unbanded with 45 yellow banded. Selection was measured using an analysis based on generalised linear mixed models (GLMMs) that has broad applicability to all resource selection studies where extraneous variance is a problem. Using this analytic method, we found that birds altered their behaviour to produce significant anti-apostatic selection in direct response to changes in frequency of the quasi-natural Cepaea morphs.

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Published date: December 2005

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Local EPrints ID: 23980
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/23980
ISSN: 0030-1299
PURE UUID: f9a3dbf8-6e21-4711-85d1-4126b0c0303e

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Date deposited: 20 Mar 2006
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 16:15

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Author: J.A. Allen
Author: M.E. Weale

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