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An analytical model assessing the potential threat to natural habitats from insect resistance transgenes

An analytical model assessing the potential threat to natural habitats from insect resistance transgenes
An analytical model assessing the potential threat to natural habitats from insect resistance transgenes
We examine the role of ecological interactions on effective gene flow from genetically manipulated plants to their wild relatives. We do so by constructing and applying to oilseed rape (OSR) an analytical model for interaction between plants with and without an insect resistance (IR) allele in natural communities, incorporating documented levels of herbivore variability.We find that with reasonable values of advantage to the IR allele, little concomitant disadvantage (physiological costs of the allele) restricts it to low proportions of the natural population for large numbers of generations. We conclude that OSR IR transgenes are unlikely to pose an immediate threat to natural communities. Our model identifies those factors best able to regulate particular transgenes at the population level, the most effective being impaired viability of seeds in the period between production and the following growing season, although other possibilities exist. Because solutions rely on ratios, limiting values of regulating factors are testable under controlled conditions, minimizing risk of release into the environment and offering significant advancement on existing testing programmes. Our model addresses folivory but is easily modified for herbivory damaging the seed or directly affecting seed production by infested plants, or for pathogens altering seed survival in the seedbank.
genetically modified organisms (GMOs), genetically manipulated plants, temporal niche axis, invasion ecology, invasive genomes, effective gene flow
1471-2954
1759-1767
Kelly, Colleen K.
556f1e12-6423-471a-b0d6-e61025d99a6c
Bowler, Michael G.
fc460f7a-c700-488d-bb2f-8d12e13c568e
Breden, Felix
e4d9d9c3-0202-416f-a8bb-db6a1d6d26c7
Fenner, Michael
626d4c13-0ba8-4b20-b2f2-11e11cc10ae8
Poppy, Guy M.
e18524cf-10ae-4ab4-b50c-e73e7d841389
Kelly, Colleen K.
556f1e12-6423-471a-b0d6-e61025d99a6c
Bowler, Michael G.
fc460f7a-c700-488d-bb2f-8d12e13c568e
Breden, Felix
e4d9d9c3-0202-416f-a8bb-db6a1d6d26c7
Fenner, Michael
626d4c13-0ba8-4b20-b2f2-11e11cc10ae8
Poppy, Guy M.
e18524cf-10ae-4ab4-b50c-e73e7d841389

Kelly, Colleen K., Bowler, Michael G., Breden, Felix, Fenner, Michael and Poppy, Guy M. (2005) An analytical model assessing the potential threat to natural habitats from insect resistance transgenes. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 272 (1574), 1759-1767. (doi:10.1098/rspb.2005.3131).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We examine the role of ecological interactions on effective gene flow from genetically manipulated plants to their wild relatives. We do so by constructing and applying to oilseed rape (OSR) an analytical model for interaction between plants with and without an insect resistance (IR) allele in natural communities, incorporating documented levels of herbivore variability.We find that with reasonable values of advantage to the IR allele, little concomitant disadvantage (physiological costs of the allele) restricts it to low proportions of the natural population for large numbers of generations. We conclude that OSR IR transgenes are unlikely to pose an immediate threat to natural communities. Our model identifies those factors best able to regulate particular transgenes at the population level, the most effective being impaired viability of seeds in the period between production and the following growing season, although other possibilities exist. Because solutions rely on ratios, limiting values of regulating factors are testable under controlled conditions, minimizing risk of release into the environment and offering significant advancement on existing testing programmes. Our model addresses folivory but is easily modified for herbivory damaging the seed or directly affecting seed production by infested plants, or for pathogens altering seed survival in the seedbank.

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Submitted date: 10 November 2004
Published date: 15 April 2005
Keywords: genetically modified organisms (GMOs), genetically manipulated plants, temporal niche axis, invasion ecology, invasive genomes, effective gene flow

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 24021
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/24021
ISSN: 1471-2954
PURE UUID: 2664786d-12bc-4134-b3aa-479610fabd42

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Date deposited: 17 Mar 2006
Last modified: 20 Oct 2017 16:32

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