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Why do general practitioners prescribe antibiotics for sore throat? Grounded theory interview study

Why do general practitioners prescribe antibiotics for sore throat? Grounded theory interview study
Why do general practitioners prescribe antibiotics for sore throat? Grounded theory interview study
Objectives: to understand why general practitioners prescribe antibiotics for some cases of sore throat and to explore the factors that influence their prescribing.

Design: grounded theory interview study.

Setting: general practice.

Participants: 40 general practitioners: 25 in the maximum variety sample and 15 in the theoretical sample.

Results: general practitioners are uncertain which patients will benefit from antibiotics but prescribe for sicker patients and for patients from socioeconomically deprived backgrounds because of concerns about complications. They are also more likely to prescribe in pressured clinical contexts. Doctors are mostly comfortable with their prescribing decisions and are not prescribing to maintain the doctor-patient relationship.

Conclusions: general practitioners have reduced prescribing for sore throat in response to research and policy initiatives. Further interventions to reduce prescribing would need to improve identification of patients at risk of complications and be workable in busy clinical situations.
0959-8138
138
Kumar, Satinder
a95ff9c1-b421-4712-aeb5-f4d414ebbc02
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Britten, Nicky
68f95423-a4ec-4e8d-afe9-1ed72a5b11e1
Kumar, Satinder
a95ff9c1-b421-4712-aeb5-f4d414ebbc02
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Britten, Nicky
68f95423-a4ec-4e8d-afe9-1ed72a5b11e1

Kumar, Satinder, Little, Paul and Britten, Nicky (2003) Why do general practitioners prescribe antibiotics for sore throat? Grounded theory interview study. BMJ, 326 (7381), 138. (doi:10.1136/bmj.326.7381.138).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: to understand why general practitioners prescribe antibiotics for some cases of sore throat and to explore the factors that influence their prescribing.

Design: grounded theory interview study.

Setting: general practice.

Participants: 40 general practitioners: 25 in the maximum variety sample and 15 in the theoretical sample.

Results: general practitioners are uncertain which patients will benefit from antibiotics but prescribe for sicker patients and for patients from socioeconomically deprived backgrounds because of concerns about complications. They are also more likely to prescribe in pressured clinical contexts. Doctors are mostly comfortable with their prescribing decisions and are not prescribing to maintain the doctor-patient relationship.

Conclusions: general practitioners have reduced prescribing for sore throat in response to research and policy initiatives. Further interventions to reduce prescribing would need to improve identification of patients at risk of complications and be workable in busy clinical situations.

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More information

Published date: 18 January 2003

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 24366
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/24366
ISSN: 0959-8138
PURE UUID: 406887ed-642f-4bac-97c7-dd07ed397954

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Date deposited: 30 Mar 2006
Last modified: 08 Jan 2022 09:52

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Contributors

Author: Satinder Kumar
Author: Paul Little
Author: Nicky Britten

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