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Continuing professional development (CPD): GPs' perceptions of post-graduate education-approved (PGEA) meetings and personal professional development plans (PDPs)

Continuing professional development (CPD): GPs' perceptions of post-graduate education-approved (PGEA) meetings and personal professional development plans (PDPs)
Continuing professional development (CPD): GPs' perceptions of post-graduate education-approved (PGEA) meetings and personal professional development plans (PDPs)
Background. Conventional post-graduate meetings—typically ‘lunchtime’ meetings outside practices—have been heavily criticized. Revalidation is also impending, and there has been associated pressure for the widespread introduction of personal development plans (PDPs). However, there is very little empirical evidence about the usefulness to GPs of different kinds of educational meeting or of PDPs.
Objectives. Our aim was to assess the utility to GPs of different types of post-graduate meeting and PDPs.
Methods. A postal questionnaire was sent to 921 GP principals in three health authorities, who were asked to recall their most recent post-graduate education-approved (PGEA) meetings (practice-based and ‘outside’) and the latest major learning ‘undertaken’ in their PDP.
Results. A total of 698 GPs (76%) returned questionnaires. A substantial minority (208; 30%) had a PDP. Most had undertaken education recently [median time elapsed (weeks): meeting ‘outside’ practice, 4; ‘practice-based’, 5; PDP, 3]. Education had not changed clinical practice for many GPs (‘practice-based’ 39% reported no change; ‘outside’ meetings 50% and PDPs 57%). A change in practice after a practice meeting was related to relevance to everyday practice [disagree/neutral, agree, strongly agree odds ratios: 1.00, 4.22 (95% CI 2.1–8.6) and 5.9 (2.6–13.3), respectively], to lecturer factors (enthusiasm, summarizing important points, handouts) and to social enjoyment. PDPs were less likely to be perceived relevant to practice (practice-based meeting, ‘outside’ meeting, PDPs: 89, 87 and 72%, respectively), as a break from practice (54,72 and 18%), good socially (63, 72 and 15%), good for professional networking (54, 70 and 19%) and glad to have done it (84, 86 and 44%). Being glad to use a PDP was more likely if the learning was clinically relevant, a break from practice, and incorporated professional networking.
Conclusion. Changes in practice after post-graduate meetings are not only related to clinical relevance and lecturer factors, but also to professional and social factors. PDPs may not be providing better learning opportunities or enjoyment than traditional meetings, although GPs who are glad to use PDPs incorporate clinical relevance, a break from practice and networking. Post-graduate tutors should probably continue to support and monitor the lecturer quality and clinical relevance of a balanced portfolio of both practice-based and ‘outside’ meetings.
continuing professional development, gps, pdps, pgea meetings
0263-2136
192 -198
Little, Paul
b17f6ea5-5dd6-4e73-924d-eaf9bc523950
Hayes, Stephen
c7f46678-8685-4d1e-956e-1cb0284a7355
Little, Paul
b17f6ea5-5dd6-4e73-924d-eaf9bc523950
Hayes, Stephen
c7f46678-8685-4d1e-956e-1cb0284a7355

Little, Paul and Hayes, Stephen (2003) Continuing professional development (CPD): GPs' perceptions of post-graduate education-approved (PGEA) meetings and personal professional development plans (PDPs). Family Practice, 20 (2), 192 -198.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background. Conventional post-graduate meetings—typically ‘lunchtime’ meetings outside practices—have been heavily criticized. Revalidation is also impending, and there has been associated pressure for the widespread introduction of personal development plans (PDPs). However, there is very little empirical evidence about the usefulness to GPs of different kinds of educational meeting or of PDPs.
Objectives. Our aim was to assess the utility to GPs of different types of post-graduate meeting and PDPs.
Methods. A postal questionnaire was sent to 921 GP principals in three health authorities, who were asked to recall their most recent post-graduate education-approved (PGEA) meetings (practice-based and ‘outside’) and the latest major learning ‘undertaken’ in their PDP.
Results. A total of 698 GPs (76%) returned questionnaires. A substantial minority (208; 30%) had a PDP. Most had undertaken education recently [median time elapsed (weeks): meeting ‘outside’ practice, 4; ‘practice-based’, 5; PDP, 3]. Education had not changed clinical practice for many GPs (‘practice-based’ 39% reported no change; ‘outside’ meetings 50% and PDPs 57%). A change in practice after a practice meeting was related to relevance to everyday practice [disagree/neutral, agree, strongly agree odds ratios: 1.00, 4.22 (95% CI 2.1–8.6) and 5.9 (2.6–13.3), respectively], to lecturer factors (enthusiasm, summarizing important points, handouts) and to social enjoyment. PDPs were less likely to be perceived relevant to practice (practice-based meeting, ‘outside’ meeting, PDPs: 89, 87 and 72%, respectively), as a break from practice (54,72 and 18%), good socially (63, 72 and 15%), good for professional networking (54, 70 and 19%) and glad to have done it (84, 86 and 44%). Being glad to use a PDP was more likely if the learning was clinically relevant, a break from practice, and incorporated professional networking.
Conclusion. Changes in practice after post-graduate meetings are not only related to clinical relevance and lecturer factors, but also to professional and social factors. PDPs may not be providing better learning opportunities or enjoyment than traditional meetings, although GPs who are glad to use PDPs incorporate clinical relevance, a break from practice and networking. Post-graduate tutors should probably continue to support and monitor the lecturer quality and clinical relevance of a balanced portfolio of both practice-based and ‘outside’ meetings.

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More information

Published date: 2003
Additional Information: Education in Primary Care
Keywords: continuing professional development, gps, pdps, pgea meetings

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 24405
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/24405
ISSN: 0263-2136
PURE UUID: 9969672c-a048-411a-bc8f-56ba31030904

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Mar 2006
Last modified: 08 Jan 2022 06:48

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Contributors

Author: Paul Little
Author: Stephen Hayes

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