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Complementary and alternative medicine whole systems research: Beyond identification of inadequacies of the RCT

Complementary and alternative medicine whole systems research: Beyond identification of inadequacies of the RCT
Complementary and alternative medicine whole systems research: Beyond identification of inadequacies of the RCT
Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) often consists of whole systems of care (such as naturopathic medicine or traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)) that combine a wide range of modalities to provide individualised treatment. The complexity of these interventions and their potential synergistic effect requires innovative evaluative approaches. Model validity, which encompasses the need for research to adequately address the unique healing theory and therapeutic context of the intervention, is central to whole systems research (WSR). Classical randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are limited in their ability to address this need. Therefore, we propose a mixed methods approach that includes a range of relevant and holistic outcome measures. As the individual components of most whole systems are inseparable, complementary and synergistic, WSR must not focus only on the “active” ingredients of a system. An emerging WSR framework must be non-hierarchical, cyclical, flexible and adaptive, as knowledge creation is continuous, evolutionary and necessitates a continuous interplay between research methods and “phases” of knowledge. Finally, WSR must hold qualitative and quantitative research methods in equal esteem to realize their unique research contribution. Whole systems are complex and therefore no one method can adequately capture the meaning, process and outcomes of these interventions.
0965-2299
206-212
Verhoef, Marja J.
0a894fbc-fb6d-45e4-84ea-9e499215d19a
Lewith, George
0fc483fa-f17b-47c5-94d9-5c15e65a7625
Ritenbaugh, Cheryl
30b79ebe-6868-4ade-a051-464b654c3b77
Boon, Heather
cfb4982c-c21b-4e11-a41b-ccf468f325ef
Fleishman, Susan
1100d3f0-6d3f-4aed-8519-639fb8f7e2bc
Leis, Anne
bb63f886-31c3-4b78-8744-360f78009896
Verhoef, Marja J.
0a894fbc-fb6d-45e4-84ea-9e499215d19a
Lewith, George
0fc483fa-f17b-47c5-94d9-5c15e65a7625
Ritenbaugh, Cheryl
30b79ebe-6868-4ade-a051-464b654c3b77
Boon, Heather
cfb4982c-c21b-4e11-a41b-ccf468f325ef
Fleishman, Susan
1100d3f0-6d3f-4aed-8519-639fb8f7e2bc
Leis, Anne
bb63f886-31c3-4b78-8744-360f78009896

Verhoef, Marja J., Lewith, George, Ritenbaugh, Cheryl, Boon, Heather, Fleishman, Susan and Leis, Anne (2005) Complementary and alternative medicine whole systems research: Beyond identification of inadequacies of the RCT. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 13 (3), 206-212. (doi:10.1016/j.ctim.2005.05.001).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) often consists of whole systems of care (such as naturopathic medicine or traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)) that combine a wide range of modalities to provide individualised treatment. The complexity of these interventions and their potential synergistic effect requires innovative evaluative approaches. Model validity, which encompasses the need for research to adequately address the unique healing theory and therapeutic context of the intervention, is central to whole systems research (WSR). Classical randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are limited in their ability to address this need. Therefore, we propose a mixed methods approach that includes a range of relevant and holistic outcome measures. As the individual components of most whole systems are inseparable, complementary and synergistic, WSR must not focus only on the “active” ingredients of a system. An emerging WSR framework must be non-hierarchical, cyclical, flexible and adaptive, as knowledge creation is continuous, evolutionary and necessitates a continuous interplay between research methods and “phases” of knowledge. Finally, WSR must hold qualitative and quantitative research methods in equal esteem to realize their unique research contribution. Whole systems are complex and therefore no one method can adequately capture the meaning, process and outcomes of these interventions.

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Published date: 2005

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 24536
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/24536
ISSN: 0965-2299
PURE UUID: aef4fd56-0173-4b64-a11a-affaa2a3bba3

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Date deposited: 30 Mar 2006
Last modified: 07 Jan 2022 22:15

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Contributors

Author: Marja J. Verhoef
Author: George Lewith
Author: Cheryl Ritenbaugh
Author: Heather Boon
Author: Susan Fleishman
Author: Anne Leis

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