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Pitch-synchronous Decomposition of Mixed-source Speech Signals

Pitch-synchronous Decomposition of Mixed-source Speech Signals
Pitch-synchronous Decomposition of Mixed-source Speech Signals
As part of a study of turbulence-noise sources in speech production, a method has been developed for decomposing an acoustic signal into harmonic (voiced) and anharmonic (unvoiced) components, based on a hoarseness metric (Muta et al., 1988, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, pp.1292-1301). Their pitch-synchronous harmonic filter (PSHF) has been extended (to EPSHF) to yield time histories of both harmonic and anharmonic components. Our corpus includes many examples of turbulence noise, including aspiration, voiced and unvoiced fricatives, and a variety of voice qualities (e.g. breathy, whispered). The EPSHF algorithm plausibly decomposed breathy vowels, but the harmonic component of voiced fricatives still contained significant noise, similar in shape to (though weaker than) the ensemble-averaged anharmonic spectrum. In general the algorithm performed best on sustained sounds. Tracking errors at rapid transitions, and due to jitter and shimmer, were spuriously attributed to the anharmonic component. However, the extracted anharmonic component clearly exhibited modulation in voiced fricatives. While such modulation has been previously reported (and also in hoarse voice), it was verified by tests on synthetic signals, where constant and modulated noise signals were extracted successfully. The results suggest that the EPSHF will continue to enable exploration of the interaction of phonation and turbulence noise.
263-264
Jackson, P.J.B.
81dc3458-f913-44b4-9829-ecb626df5278
Shadle, C.H.
dc56253d-9926-466f-a27c-b9a8252a5304
Jackson, P.J.B.
81dc3458-f913-44b4-9829-ecb626df5278
Shadle, C.H.
dc56253d-9926-466f-a27c-b9a8252a5304

Jackson, P.J.B. and Shadle, C.H. (1998) Pitch-synchronous Decomposition of Mixed-source Speech Signals. 16th ICA/135th ASA. pp. 263-264 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

As part of a study of turbulence-noise sources in speech production, a method has been developed for decomposing an acoustic signal into harmonic (voiced) and anharmonic (unvoiced) components, based on a hoarseness metric (Muta et al., 1988, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, pp.1292-1301). Their pitch-synchronous harmonic filter (PSHF) has been extended (to EPSHF) to yield time histories of both harmonic and anharmonic components. Our corpus includes many examples of turbulence noise, including aspiration, voiced and unvoiced fricatives, and a variety of voice qualities (e.g. breathy, whispered). The EPSHF algorithm plausibly decomposed breathy vowels, but the harmonic component of voiced fricatives still contained significant noise, similar in shape to (though weaker than) the ensemble-averaged anharmonic spectrum. In general the algorithm performed best on sustained sounds. Tracking errors at rapid transitions, and due to jitter and shimmer, were spuriously attributed to the anharmonic component. However, the extracted anharmonic component clearly exhibited modulation in voiced fricatives. While such modulation has been previously reported (and also in hoarse voice), it was verified by tests on synthetic signals, where constant and modulated noise signals were extracted successfully. The results suggest that the EPSHF will continue to enable exploration of the interaction of phonation and turbulence noise.

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More information

Published date: June 1998
Additional Information: Organisation: ICA-ASA Address: Seattle, WA, USA
Venue - Dates: 16th ICA/135th ASA, 1998-05-31
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 250431
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/250431
PURE UUID: 7a818bbf-9541-4818-8421-da0616fb74d6

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Date deposited: 06 Jan 2000
Last modified: 29 Jan 2020 14:58

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