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Efficiently Generating Efficient Generating Extensions in Prolog

Efficiently Generating Efficient Generating Extensions in Prolog
Efficiently Generating Efficient Generating Extensions in Prolog
The so called “cogen approach” to program specialisation, writing a compiler generator instead of a specialiser, has been used with considerable success in partial evaluation of both functional and imperative languages.

This paper demonstrates that this approach is also applicable to partial evaluation of logic programming languages, also called partial deduction. Self-application has not been as much in focus in partial deduction as in partial evaluation of functional and imperative languages, and the attempts to self-apply partial deduction systems have, of yet, not been altogether that successful. So, especially for partial deduction, the cogen approach could prove to have a considerable importance when it comes to practical applications.

It is demonstrated that using the cogen approach one gets very efficient compiler generators which generate very efficient generating extensions which in turn yield (for some examples at least) very good and non-trivial specialisation.
ISBN 3-540-61580-6
238-262
Springer
Jørgensen, J.
577a6efd-6180-4244-a218-8153462bc35d
Leuschel, M.
6d6fd7ab-c48a-47ea-bf36-f667cef2c629
Danvy, Olivier
Glück, Robert
Thiemann, Peter
Jørgensen, J.
577a6efd-6180-4244-a218-8153462bc35d
Leuschel, M.
6d6fd7ab-c48a-47ea-bf36-f667cef2c629
Danvy, Olivier
Glück, Robert
Thiemann, Peter

Jørgensen, J. and Leuschel, M. (1996) Efficiently Generating Efficient Generating Extensions in Prolog. Danvy, Olivier, Glück, Robert and Thiemann, Peter (eds.) In Partial Evaluation: International Seminar Dagstuhl Castle, Germany, February 12–16, 1996 Selected Papers. vol. 1110, Springer. pp. 238-262 . (doi:10.1007/3-540-61580-6_12).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The so called “cogen approach” to program specialisation, writing a compiler generator instead of a specialiser, has been used with considerable success in partial evaluation of both functional and imperative languages.

This paper demonstrates that this approach is also applicable to partial evaluation of logic programming languages, also called partial deduction. Self-application has not been as much in focus in partial deduction as in partial evaluation of functional and imperative languages, and the attempts to self-apply partial deduction systems have, of yet, not been altogether that successful. So, especially for partial deduction, the cogen approach could prove to have a considerable importance when it comes to practical applications.

It is demonstrated that using the cogen approach one gets very efficient compiler generators which generate very efficient generating extensions which in turn yield (for some examples at least) very good and non-trivial specialisation.

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More information

Published date: 1996
Venue - Dates: Dagstuhl Seminar on Partial Evaulation, Germany, 1996-02-12 - 1996-02-16
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 250598
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/250598
ISBN: ISBN 3-540-61580-6
PURE UUID: 7343b6dd-841c-4c98-8db9-6af038a4e7cd

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Date deposited: 14 Jun 1999
Last modified: 12 Sep 2019 16:30

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Contributors

Author: J. Jørgensen
Author: M. Leuschel
Editor: Olivier Danvy
Editor: Robert Glück
Editor: Peter Thiemann

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