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Prenatal exposure to a maternal low protein diet shortens life span in rats

Prenatal exposure to a maternal low protein diet shortens life span in rats
Prenatal exposure to a maternal low protein diet shortens life span in rats
Background: Postweaning diet restriction is associated with prolongation of life span, reduced age-related disease and slower ageing. The effects of diet restriction imposed prior to weaning have not been so well characterised, but studies suggest an opposite effect with increased age-related diseases occurring in offspring exposed to undernutrition in prenatal life. It remains unclear whether life span is similarly adversely affected by early diet restriction.
Objective: The present study in rats aimed to evaluate the impact of a maternal low protein diet upon the life span of the resulting offspring.
Methods: Rat dams were fed either a 180-gram casein/kg control diet or a 90-gram casein/kg low protein diet from conception until the end of pregnancy. The offspring were then maintained with minimal handling until death from natural causes or distress-necessitated euthanasia.
Results: The average life span of female rats exposed to low protein diets in utero was reduced by 11% (p = 0.044, Kaplan-Meier analysis). There was a similar but non- significant trend in the male offspring (control 76 ± 3 weeks, low protein 73 ± 3 weeks). In addition the rats exposed to a prenatal low protein diet had significantly higher systolic blood pressure at 4 weeks of age and tended to be smaller than control animals in postnatal life.
Conclusion: The results suggest that intrauterine diet restriction reduces life span in rats and contrasts with the well-recognised increase in life span produced by postweaning diet restriction. The timing of the nutritional intervention appears to be critical and recognition of this is relevant to understanding the mechanisms underlying the effects of diet restriction on ageing and life span.
diet restriction, low protein diet, prenatal
0304-324X
9-14
Aihie-Sayer, Avan
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Dunn, Rebecca
82dfc0ad-0e55-4973-9361-d72b365ce50c
Langley-Evans, Simon
dd756517-c254-4a22-95d2-4b3e09edca8e
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Aihie-Sayer, Avan
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Dunn, Rebecca
82dfc0ad-0e55-4973-9361-d72b365ce50c
Langley-Evans, Simon
dd756517-c254-4a22-95d2-4b3e09edca8e
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6

Aihie-Sayer, Avan, Dunn, Rebecca, Langley-Evans, Simon and Cooper, Cyrus (2001) Prenatal exposure to a maternal low protein diet shortens life span in rats. Gerontology, 47 (1), 9-14. (doi:10.1159/000052764).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Postweaning diet restriction is associated with prolongation of life span, reduced age-related disease and slower ageing. The effects of diet restriction imposed prior to weaning have not been so well characterised, but studies suggest an opposite effect with increased age-related diseases occurring in offspring exposed to undernutrition in prenatal life. It remains unclear whether life span is similarly adversely affected by early diet restriction.
Objective: The present study in rats aimed to evaluate the impact of a maternal low protein diet upon the life span of the resulting offspring.
Methods: Rat dams were fed either a 180-gram casein/kg control diet or a 90-gram casein/kg low protein diet from conception until the end of pregnancy. The offspring were then maintained with minimal handling until death from natural causes or distress-necessitated euthanasia.
Results: The average life span of female rats exposed to low protein diets in utero was reduced by 11% (p = 0.044, Kaplan-Meier analysis). There was a similar but non- significant trend in the male offspring (control 76 ± 3 weeks, low protein 73 ± 3 weeks). In addition the rats exposed to a prenatal low protein diet had significantly higher systolic blood pressure at 4 weeks of age and tended to be smaller than control animals in postnatal life.
Conclusion: The results suggest that intrauterine diet restriction reduces life span in rats and contrasts with the well-recognised increase in life span produced by postweaning diet restriction. The timing of the nutritional intervention appears to be critical and recognition of this is relevant to understanding the mechanisms underlying the effects of diet restriction on ageing and life span.

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More information

Published date: 2001
Keywords: diet restriction, low protein diet, prenatal

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 25184
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/25184
ISSN: 0304-324X
PURE UUID: 2c1ef5cc-468f-4dcb-b06f-9cd6f81d350a
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Apr 2006
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:59

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