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Does sarcopenia originate in early life? Findings from the Hertfordshire cohort study

Does sarcopenia originate in early life? Findings from the Hertfordshire cohort study
Does sarcopenia originate in early life? Findings from the Hertfordshire cohort study
Background: Sarcopenia is defined as the loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength with aging. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that men and women who grew less well in early life have lower muscle strength. Our objective was to investigate the relationship between birth weight, infant growth, and the development of sarcopenia.
Methods: We studied 730 men and 673 women, of known birth weight and weight at 1 year, who were born in Hertfordshire, U.K., between 1931 and 1939. Participants completed a health questionnaire, and we measured their height, weight, and grip strength. Standard deviation scores for birth weight, and for infant growth conditional on birth weight, were analyzed in relation to grip strength before and after adjustment for adult size.
Results: Grip strength was most strongly associated with birth weight in men (r = 0.19, p <.001) and women (r = 0.16, p <.001). These relationships remained significant after adjustment for adult height and weight. In contrast, the associations with infant growth were weakened after allowing for adult size. Adjustment for age, current social class, physical activity, smoking, and alcohol did not affect these results.
Conclusions: Birth weight is associated with sarcopenia in men and women, independently of adult height and weight. The influence of infant growth on long-term muscle strength appears to be mediated through adult size. Sarcopenia may have its origins in early life, and identifying influences operating across the whole life course may yield considerable advances in developing effective interventions.

1079-5006
M930-M934
Aihie-Sayer, Avan
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Syddall, Holly E.
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Gilbody, Helen J.
f78b5dfc-7e86-482e-b9d1-bd23e1372803
Dennison, Elaine M.
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Aihie-Sayer, Avan
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Syddall, Holly E.
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Gilbody, Helen J.
f78b5dfc-7e86-482e-b9d1-bd23e1372803
Dennison, Elaine M.
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6

Aihie-Sayer, Avan, Syddall, Holly E., Gilbody, Helen J., Dennison, Elaine M. and Cooper, Cyrus (2004) Does sarcopenia originate in early life? Findings from the Hertfordshire cohort study. The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 59 (9), M930-M934.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Sarcopenia is defined as the loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength with aging. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that men and women who grew less well in early life have lower muscle strength. Our objective was to investigate the relationship between birth weight, infant growth, and the development of sarcopenia.
Methods: We studied 730 men and 673 women, of known birth weight and weight at 1 year, who were born in Hertfordshire, U.K., between 1931 and 1939. Participants completed a health questionnaire, and we measured their height, weight, and grip strength. Standard deviation scores for birth weight, and for infant growth conditional on birth weight, were analyzed in relation to grip strength before and after adjustment for adult size.
Results: Grip strength was most strongly associated with birth weight in men (r = 0.19, p <.001) and women (r = 0.16, p <.001). These relationships remained significant after adjustment for adult height and weight. In contrast, the associations with infant growth were weakened after allowing for adult size. Adjustment for age, current social class, physical activity, smoking, and alcohol did not affect these results.
Conclusions: Birth weight is associated with sarcopenia in men and women, independently of adult height and weight. The influence of infant growth on long-term muscle strength appears to be mediated through adult size. Sarcopenia may have its origins in early life, and identifying influences operating across the whole life course may yield considerable advances in developing effective interventions.

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Published date: 2004

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Local EPrints ID: 25190
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/25190
ISSN: 1079-5006
PURE UUID: d0f535c2-b623-4ef6-8ff7-a0f24e1000c2
ORCID for Holly E. Syddall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0171-0306
ORCID for Elaine M. Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

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Date deposited: 07 Apr 2006
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:50

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Contributors

Author: Avan Aihie-Sayer
Author: Helen J. Gilbody
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD

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