The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Increase of low frequency noise generating defects in today's CMOS/BiCMOS technologies

Increase of low frequency noise generating defects in today's CMOS/BiCMOS technologies
Increase of low frequency noise generating defects in today's CMOS/BiCMOS technologies
Defects present in semiconductor layers can lead to increased transistor low frequency noise. This paper reports on the noise performance degradation caused by modern complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) and bipolar-CMOS (BiCMOS) processing techniques, these being the rapid thermal annealing (RTA) of metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) and the use of polysilicon emitters in bipolar transistors.

A rise in both the bulk and oxide defect densities was thought to be responsible for the increased noise of RTA MOSFETs over conventionally annealed devices. A significant low frequency noise component was discovered to be present in poly-silicon-emitter transistors. This was thought to be due to the presence of SiO2 at the polysilicon-single-crystal interface.
0921-5107
367-372
Murray, D.C.
2bce70f8-76ce-4693-bd84-22f43561e746
Siabi-Shahrivar, N.
c44c0070-13d6-4311-a647-ce75fb649416
Evans, A.G.R.
c4a3f208-8fd9-491d-870f-ce7eef943311
Redman-White, W.
d5376167-c925-460f-8e9c-13bffda8e0bf
Carter, J.C.
6a4e2120-5d03-4621-9ebc-ba8901e40e7a
Altrip, J.L.
17142133-bd7b-47ec-8fe7-42d39fad5f2b
Murray, D.C.
2bce70f8-76ce-4693-bd84-22f43561e746
Siabi-Shahrivar, N.
c44c0070-13d6-4311-a647-ce75fb649416
Evans, A.G.R.
c4a3f208-8fd9-491d-870f-ce7eef943311
Redman-White, W.
d5376167-c925-460f-8e9c-13bffda8e0bf
Carter, J.C.
6a4e2120-5d03-4621-9ebc-ba8901e40e7a
Altrip, J.L.
17142133-bd7b-47ec-8fe7-42d39fad5f2b

Murray, D.C., Siabi-Shahrivar, N., Evans, A.G.R., Redman-White, W., Carter, J.C. and Altrip, J.L. (1989) Increase of low frequency noise generating defects in today's CMOS/BiCMOS technologies. Materials Science and Engineering: B, 4 (1-4), 367-372. (doi:10.1016/0921-5107(89)90272-9).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Defects present in semiconductor layers can lead to increased transistor low frequency noise. This paper reports on the noise performance degradation caused by modern complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) and bipolar-CMOS (BiCMOS) processing techniques, these being the rapid thermal annealing (RTA) of metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) and the use of polysilicon emitters in bipolar transistors.

A rise in both the bulk and oxide defect densities was thought to be responsible for the increased noise of RTA MOSFETs over conventionally annealed devices. A significant low frequency noise component was discovered to be present in poly-silicon-emitter transistors. This was thought to be due to the presence of SiO2 at the polysilicon-single-crystal interface.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: June 1989
Organisations: Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 252069
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/252069
ISSN: 0921-5107
PURE UUID: 0e4480c5-885f-4a7e-b3f2-a0d3b1474cb9

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Dec 1999
Last modified: 11 Jan 2024 17:35

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: D.C. Murray
Author: N. Siabi-Shahrivar
Author: A.G.R. Evans
Author: W. Redman-White
Author: J.C. Carter
Author: J.L. Altrip

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×