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Recent progress in arts computing

Recent progress in arts computing
Recent progress in arts computing
The application of computing in the Arts has increased dramatically in the last decade. There has been an increasing use of computer graphics to generate static art, animations, films and even live visual accompaniments for music. A less publicised use of computing, which will be explored here, is in digital imaging, archiving of fine art and image processing for analysis. Many museums and galleries are exploring the uses of imaging, from public-access systems and CD-ROM publications to internal reference archives. On-line catalogues have been created on the Internet and research is underway to link diverse image archives and databases as well as allow image-based image searching. Scanners and cameras have been specially produced for art imaging, such as the VASARI scanner and MARC camera, both capable of resolutions of around 20k x 20k pels, with colour accuracy higher than film. Digital images of increasing quality are now an important research resource. The application of conventional image processing techniques is valuable in enhancing, overlaying and comparing images. New techniques are also being developed for feature enhancement or elimination (for example cracks) and colour analysis. Imaging techniques which give calibrated CIE Lab values allow colour changes to be analysed, due to cleaning or fading for example. This paper will present a brief review of the field and specific new techniques being developed for the analysis of art.
63-69
Martinez, K.
5f711898-20fc-410e-a007-837d8c57cb18
Martinez, K.
5f711898-20fc-410e-a007-837d8c57cb18

Martinez, K. (1996) Recent progress in arts computing , pp. 63-69.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

The application of computing in the Arts has increased dramatically in the last decade. There has been an increasing use of computer graphics to generate static art, animations, films and even live visual accompaniments for music. A less publicised use of computing, which will be explored here, is in digital imaging, archiving of fine art and image processing for analysis. Many museums and galleries are exploring the uses of imaging, from public-access systems and CD-ROM publications to internal reference archives. On-line catalogues have been created on the Internet and research is underway to link diverse image archives and databases as well as allow image-based image searching. Scanners and cameras have been specially produced for art imaging, such as the VASARI scanner and MARC camera, both capable of resolutions of around 20k x 20k pels, with colour accuracy higher than film. Digital images of increasing quality are now an important research resource. The application of conventional image processing techniques is valuable in enhancing, overlaying and comparing images. New techniques are also being developed for feature enhancement or elimination (for example cracks) and colour analysis. Imaging techniques which give calibrated CIE Lab values allow colour changes to be analysed, due to cleaning or fading for example. This paper will present a brief review of the field and specific new techniques being developed for the analysis of art.

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More information

Published date: September 1996
Additional Information: invited paper Organisation: Chiba Prefectural Government
Organisations: Web & Internet Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 252230
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/252230
PURE UUID: 59c385bb-7d18-4f07-b620-655fb64b154a
ORCID for K. Martinez: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3859-5700

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Mar 2001
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 10:05

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Author: K. Martinez ORCID iD

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