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Prenatal influences on stroke mortality in England and Wales

Prenatal influences on stroke mortality in England and Wales
Prenatal influences on stroke mortality in England and Wales
Background and Purpose: Within Britain and the United States there are geographic variations in mortality from stroke that are not explained by differences in adult lifestyle. We report on the geographic distribution of stroke mortality in England and Wales and compare it with that in the United States.
Methods: Data from 4 studies are presented. The geographic distribution of stroke deaths in England and Wales during 1968–1978 is compared with the distribution of (1) other causes of death during the same years, (2) neonatal and maternal mortality during 1911–1925, (3) average adult height, and (4) place of birth.
Results: Areas of England and Wales with high stroke mortality were characterized in the past by poor living standards, demonstrated by high infant and maternal mortality rates and short stature in the adult population. People who were born in areas of high stroke mortality rather than migrating into them are at high risk. Stroke mortality is not geographically correlated with past postneonatal mortality independently of neonatal or maternal mortality. The geographic distribution of stroke mortality in the United States and England and Wales has features in common.
Conclusions: Stroke may originate through maternal influences associated with poverty. This conclusion is supported by recent findings that rates of stroke in adult life are higher among people who had low birth weight.
birth weight, epidemiology, mortality, stroke
0039-2499
1598-1602
Barker, David J. P.
84efdf7a-7c52-45fc-aa16-9647f3743c27
Lackland, Daniel T.
b8365f10-6a81-45bd-99fd-693c99182a98
Barker, David J. P.
84efdf7a-7c52-45fc-aa16-9647f3743c27
Lackland, Daniel T.
b8365f10-6a81-45bd-99fd-693c99182a98

Barker, David J. P. and Lackland, Daniel T. (2003) Prenatal influences on stroke mortality in England and Wales. Stroke, 34 (7), 1598-1602. (doi:10.1161/01.STR.0000077257.27430.7E).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background and Purpose: Within Britain and the United States there are geographic variations in mortality from stroke that are not explained by differences in adult lifestyle. We report on the geographic distribution of stroke mortality in England and Wales and compare it with that in the United States.
Methods: Data from 4 studies are presented. The geographic distribution of stroke deaths in England and Wales during 1968–1978 is compared with the distribution of (1) other causes of death during the same years, (2) neonatal and maternal mortality during 1911–1925, (3) average adult height, and (4) place of birth.
Results: Areas of England and Wales with high stroke mortality were characterized in the past by poor living standards, demonstrated by high infant and maternal mortality rates and short stature in the adult population. People who were born in areas of high stroke mortality rather than migrating into them are at high risk. Stroke mortality is not geographically correlated with past postneonatal mortality independently of neonatal or maternal mortality. The geographic distribution of stroke mortality in the United States and England and Wales has features in common.
Conclusions: Stroke may originate through maternal influences associated with poverty. This conclusion is supported by recent findings that rates of stroke in adult life are higher among people who had low birth weight.

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More information

Published date: 2003
Keywords: birth weight, epidemiology, mortality, stroke

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 25232
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/25232
ISSN: 0039-2499
PURE UUID: ba442d25-4fc9-4bd6-8b7a-95b1d3a447c5

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Apr 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:16

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