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Animal models and programming of the metabolic syndrome. Type 2 diabetes

Animal models and programming of the metabolic syndrome. Type 2 diabetes
Animal models and programming of the metabolic syndrome. Type 2 diabetes
The purpose of this review is to consider how current animal models of fetal programming contribute to knowledge of the metabolic syndrome in adult humans. Low birth weight infants have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular and coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes and stroke in adulthood. A number of animal studies confirm the association between events during fetal life and subsequent adult disease. This review considers how these have contributed to our understanding of this relationship, and how they may help to uncover the underlying mechanisms. The importance of dietary, pharmacological, genetic and surgical models is assessed, and their usefulness in the prevention of human disease evaluated. Although progress has been made, further investigations using animals are needed to clarify the mechanisms involved in the programming of adult disease. Once these processes are understood, it may be possible to identify and protect at-risk individuals.
0007-1420
103-121
Bertram, Caroline E.
7cf2f298-1d96-4966-85e5-1f41806905e2
Hanson, Mark A.
1952fad1-abc7-4284-a0bc-a7eb31f70a3f
Bertram, Caroline E.
7cf2f298-1d96-4966-85e5-1f41806905e2
Hanson, Mark A.
1952fad1-abc7-4284-a0bc-a7eb31f70a3f

Bertram, Caroline E. and Hanson, Mark A. (2001) Animal models and programming of the metabolic syndrome. Type 2 diabetes. British Medical Bulletin, 60, 103-121.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The purpose of this review is to consider how current animal models of fetal programming contribute to knowledge of the metabolic syndrome in adult humans. Low birth weight infants have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular and coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes and stroke in adulthood. A number of animal studies confirm the association between events during fetal life and subsequent adult disease. This review considers how these have contributed to our understanding of this relationship, and how they may help to uncover the underlying mechanisms. The importance of dietary, pharmacological, genetic and surgical models is assessed, and their usefulness in the prevention of human disease evaluated. Although progress has been made, further investigations using animals are needed to clarify the mechanisms involved in the programming of adult disease. Once these processes are understood, it may be possible to identify and protect at-risk individuals.

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Published date: 2001

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 25249
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/25249
ISSN: 0007-1420
PURE UUID: 0d87b952-2f90-4fe7-81f2-17faef8ad840
ORCID for Mark A. Hanson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6907-613X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Apr 2006
Last modified: 27 Jul 2018 00:34

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