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Polyunsaturated fatty acids and rheumatoid arthritis

Polyunsaturated fatty acids and rheumatoid arthritis
Polyunsaturated fatty acids and rheumatoid arthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by infiltration of T lymphocytes, macrophages and plasma cells into the synovium, and the initiation of a chronic inflammatory state that involves overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines and a dysregulated T-helper-1-type response. Eicosanoids synthesized from arachidonic acid and cytokines cause progressive destruction of cartilage and bone. The n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid [gamma]-linolenic acid is the precursor of di-homo-[gamma]-linolenic acid. The latter and the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid, which is found in fish oil, are able to decrease the production of arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids and to decrease the production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, and the reactivity of lymphocytes. A number of double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of [gamma]-linolenic acid and fish oil in rheumatoid arthritis have shown significant improvements in a variety of clinical outcomes. These fatty acids should be included as part of the normal therapeutic approach to rheumatoid arthritis. However, it is unclear what the optimal dosage of the fatty acids is, or whether there would be extra benefit from using them in combination.
115-121
Calder, P. C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Zurier, R. B.
45203f6e-a8f0-497d-b2e7-73afcfc777d9
Calder, P. C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Zurier, R. B.
45203f6e-a8f0-497d-b2e7-73afcfc777d9

Calder, P. C. and Zurier, R. B. (2001) Polyunsaturated fatty acids and rheumatoid arthritis. Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, 4 (2), 115-121.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by infiltration of T lymphocytes, macrophages and plasma cells into the synovium, and the initiation of a chronic inflammatory state that involves overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines and a dysregulated T-helper-1-type response. Eicosanoids synthesized from arachidonic acid and cytokines cause progressive destruction of cartilage and bone. The n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid [gamma]-linolenic acid is the precursor of di-homo-[gamma]-linolenic acid. The latter and the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid, which is found in fish oil, are able to decrease the production of arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids and to decrease the production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, and the reactivity of lymphocytes. A number of double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of [gamma]-linolenic acid and fish oil in rheumatoid arthritis have shown significant improvements in a variety of clinical outcomes. These fatty acids should be included as part of the normal therapeutic approach to rheumatoid arthritis. However, it is unclear what the optimal dosage of the fatty acids is, or whether there would be extra benefit from using them in combination.

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Published date: 2001

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 25319
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/25319
PURE UUID: 9a015c0b-79e4-46f0-9a32-031ac7a7de46

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Date deposited: 07 Apr 2006
Last modified: 06 Nov 2018 17:31

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Contributors

Author: P. C. Calder
Author: R. B. Zurier

University divisions

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