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Polyunsaturated fatty acids and inflammation

Polyunsaturated fatty acids and inflammation
Polyunsaturated fatty acids and inflammation
The n–6 polyunsaturated fatty acid, arachidonic acid, is a precursor of prostaglandins, leukotrienes and related compounds that have important roles as mediators and regulators of inflammation. Consuming increased amounts of long chain n–3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (found in oily fish and fish oils) results in a partial replacement of the arachidonic acid in cell membranes by eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids. This leads to decreased production of arachidonic acid-derived mediators. This alone is a potentially beneficial anti-inflammatory effect of n–3 fatty acids. However, n–3 fatty acids have a number of other effects that might occur downstream of altered eicosanoid production or are independent of this. For example, they result in suppressed production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and can modulate adhesion molecule expression. These effects occur at the level of altered gene expression.
arachidonic acid, cytokine, eicosanoid, fish oil, inflammation, polyunsaturated fatty acid.
0300-5127
423-427
Calder, P.C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Calder, P.C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6

Calder, P.C. (2005) Polyunsaturated fatty acids and inflammation. Biochemical Society Transactions, 33 (2), 423-427.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The n–6 polyunsaturated fatty acid, arachidonic acid, is a precursor of prostaglandins, leukotrienes and related compounds that have important roles as mediators and regulators of inflammation. Consuming increased amounts of long chain n–3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (found in oily fish and fish oils) results in a partial replacement of the arachidonic acid in cell membranes by eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids. This leads to decreased production of arachidonic acid-derived mediators. This alone is a potentially beneficial anti-inflammatory effect of n–3 fatty acids. However, n–3 fatty acids have a number of other effects that might occur downstream of altered eicosanoid production or are independent of this. For example, they result in suppressed production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and can modulate adhesion molecule expression. These effects occur at the level of altered gene expression.

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More information

Published date: 2005
Keywords: arachidonic acid, cytokine, eicosanoid, fish oil, inflammation, polyunsaturated fatty acid.

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 25341
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/25341
ISSN: 0300-5127
PURE UUID: 29b9c773-d17a-4c76-8b2a-d0f5950c88f0

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Date deposited: 06 Apr 2006
Last modified: 26 Feb 2019 17:31

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Contributors

Author: P.C. Calder

University divisions

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