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Microcellular Design System (MIDAS)

Microcellular Design System (MIDAS)
Microcellular Design System (MIDAS)
With the widespread use of microcells, the definition of what is a microcell, and when a conventional cell becomes a microcell, is not consistent across all users. The authors define a microcell as the coverage area produced when the base station (BS) antenna is below the local urban skyline. typically, therefore they would expect a BS antenna height of approximately 3-9 m leading to coverage distances typically of 200-400 m from the antenna, and up to a maximum of about 1 km in extreme cases. After performing numerous microcellular propagation measurements at 900 MHz and 1.8 GHz it became apparent that if supplied with accurate detailed maps of the buildings and streets in a city a computer model could be developed capable of making accurate predictions of radio coverage in microcellular networks. Such a model has been developed to run on a PC, and considerable use of the model coupled with confirmatory measurements has demonstrated the accuracy and usefulness of the package. They discuss some of the more important issues concerning microcellular planning tools, and give details about the development of the prediction package, known as MIDAS.
8/1-8/4
Webb, W.T.
37b26109-ae46-4bbb-b0bb-d7b89a62b9e9
Steele, R.
7035a3e5-8a4c-434b-a105-46fe2d63d5c3
Webb, W.T.
37b26109-ae46-4bbb-b0bb-d7b89a62b9e9
Steele, R.
7035a3e5-8a4c-434b-a105-46fe2d63d5c3

Webb, W.T. and Steele, R. (1992) Microcellular Design System (MIDAS). IEE Conference on Microcellular Propagation Modelling. 8/1-8/4 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

With the widespread use of microcells, the definition of what is a microcell, and when a conventional cell becomes a microcell, is not consistent across all users. The authors define a microcell as the coverage area produced when the base station (BS) antenna is below the local urban skyline. typically, therefore they would expect a BS antenna height of approximately 3-9 m leading to coverage distances typically of 200-400 m from the antenna, and up to a maximum of about 1 km in extreme cases. After performing numerous microcellular propagation measurements at 900 MHz and 1.8 GHz it became apparent that if supplied with accurate detailed maps of the buildings and streets in a city a computer model could be developed capable of making accurate predictions of radio coverage in microcellular networks. Such a model has been developed to run on a PC, and considerable use of the model coupled with confirmatory measurements has demonstrated the accuracy and usefulness of the package. They discuss some of the more important issues concerning microcellular planning tools, and give details about the development of the prediction package, known as MIDAS.

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More information

Published date: November 1992
Venue - Dates: IEE Conference on Microcellular Propagation Modelling, 1992-11-01
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 253784
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/253784
PURE UUID: 7e7d31b1-f32b-4d9b-872c-ee86b9855936

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Aug 2000
Last modified: 08 Mar 2019 17:30

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