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Do interventions which reduce colonic bacterial fermentation improve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome?

Do interventions which reduce colonic bacterial fermentation improve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome?
Do interventions which reduce colonic bacterial fermentation improve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome?
Abnormal fermentation may be an important factor in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Gastroenteritis or antibiotic therapy may damage the colonic microflora, leading to increased fermentation and the accumulation of gas. Gas excretion may be measured by whole-body calorimetry but there has only been one such study on IBS to date. We aimed to assess the relationship between IBS symptoms and fermentation rates in IBS. A purpose-built, 1.4-m3, whole-body calorimeter was used to assess excretion of H2 and CH4 in IBS subjects while consuming a standard diet and, again, after open randomization on either the standard diet together with the antibiotic metronidazole or a fiber-free diet to reduce fermentation. Metronidazole significantly reduced the 24-hr excretion of hydrogen (median value compared to the control group, 397 vs 230 ml/24 hr) and total gas (H2 + CH4; 671 vs 422 ml/min) and the maximum rate of gas excretion (1.6 vs 0.8 ml/min), as did a no-fiber polymeric diet (hydrogen, 418 vs 176 ml/min; total gas, 564 vs 205 ml/min; maximum rate of gas excretion, 1.35 vs 0.45 ml/min), with a significant improvement in abdominal symptoms. IBS may be associated with rapid excretion of gaseous products of fermentation, whose reduction may improve symptoms
irritable bowel syndrome, bacterial fermentation, antibiotics, enteral feeds, calorimetry, hydroge, methane
0163-2116
758-766
Dear, Keith L.E
d2d54a38-c861-40af-81d6-bd06c382b58d
Elia, Marinos
964bf436-e623-46d6-bc3f-5dd04c9ef4c1
Hunter, John O.
d70db730-78ca-4997-b40c-6dc82914670c
Dear, Keith L.E
d2d54a38-c861-40af-81d6-bd06c382b58d
Elia, Marinos
964bf436-e623-46d6-bc3f-5dd04c9ef4c1
Hunter, John O.
d70db730-78ca-4997-b40c-6dc82914670c

Dear, Keith L.E, Elia, Marinos and Hunter, John O. (2005) Do interventions which reduce colonic bacterial fermentation improve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome? Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 50 (4), 758-766. (doi:10.1007/s10620-005-2570-4).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Abnormal fermentation may be an important factor in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Gastroenteritis or antibiotic therapy may damage the colonic microflora, leading to increased fermentation and the accumulation of gas. Gas excretion may be measured by whole-body calorimetry but there has only been one such study on IBS to date. We aimed to assess the relationship between IBS symptoms and fermentation rates in IBS. A purpose-built, 1.4-m3, whole-body calorimeter was used to assess excretion of H2 and CH4 in IBS subjects while consuming a standard diet and, again, after open randomization on either the standard diet together with the antibiotic metronidazole or a fiber-free diet to reduce fermentation. Metronidazole significantly reduced the 24-hr excretion of hydrogen (median value compared to the control group, 397 vs 230 ml/24 hr) and total gas (H2 + CH4; 671 vs 422 ml/min) and the maximum rate of gas excretion (1.6 vs 0.8 ml/min), as did a no-fiber polymeric diet (hydrogen, 418 vs 176 ml/min; total gas, 564 vs 205 ml/min; maximum rate of gas excretion, 1.35 vs 0.45 ml/min), with a significant improvement in abdominal symptoms. IBS may be associated with rapid excretion of gaseous products of fermentation, whose reduction may improve symptoms

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More information

Published date: 2005
Keywords: irritable bowel syndrome, bacterial fermentation, antibiotics, enteral feeds, calorimetry, hydroge, methane

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 25398
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/25398
ISSN: 0163-2116
PURE UUID: ebf7428d-bf9c-4b70-98d6-c5f5d172f0c0

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Date deposited: 07 Apr 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:16

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