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A Neurotrophic Model of the Development of the Retinogeniculocortical Pathway Induced by Spontaneous Retinal Waves

A Neurotrophic Model of the Development of the Retinogeniculocortical Pathway Induced by Spontaneous Retinal Waves
A Neurotrophic Model of the Development of the Retinogeniculocortical Pathway Induced by Spontaneous Retinal Waves
The development of the retinogeniculate pathway or the geniculocortical pathway, or both, occurs either before birth or before eye opening in many species. It is widely believed that spontaneous retinal activity could drive the segregation of afferents into eye-specific laminae or columns and the refinement of initially diffuse receptive fields and the emergence of orderly, retinotopic organization. We show that a recent computational model that generates a phenomenologically accurate representation of spontaneous retinal activity can indeed drive afferent segregation and, more particularly, topographic and receptive field refinement in the retinogeniculocortical system. We use a model of anatomical synaptic plasticity based on recent data suggesting that afferents might compete for limited amounts of retrograde neurotrophic factors (NTFs). We find that afferent segregation and receptive field formation are disrupted in the presence of exogenous NTFs. We thus predict that infusion of NTFs into the lateral geniculate nucleus should disrupt normal development and that the infusion of such factors into the striate cortex should disrupt receptive field refinement in addition to the well known disruption of ocular dominance column (ODC) formation. To demonstrate that the capacity of our model of plasticity to drive normal development is not restricted just to spontaneous retinal activity, we also use a coarse representation of visually evoked activity in some simulations. We find that such simulations can exhibit the formation of ODCs followed by their disappearance, reminiscent of the New World marmoset. A decrease in interocular correlations stabilizes these ODCs. Thus we predict that divergent strabismus should render marmoset ODCs stable into adulthood. Key words: spontaneous retinal activity; neurotrophic interactions; ocular dominance columns; receptive field refinement; neuronal development; lateral geniculate nucleus; striate cortex; mathematical models
spontaneous retinal activity, neurotrophic interactions, ocular dominance columns, receptive field refinement, neuronal development, lateral geniculate nucleus, striate cortex, mathematical models
7951-7970
Elliott, T
b4262f0d-c295-4ea4-b5d8-3931470952f9
Shadbolt, N. R
5c5acdf4-ad42-49b6-81fe-e9db58c2caf7
Elliott, T
b4262f0d-c295-4ea4-b5d8-3931470952f9
Shadbolt, N. R
5c5acdf4-ad42-49b6-81fe-e9db58c2caf7

Elliott, T and Shadbolt, N. R (1999) A Neurotrophic Model of the Development of the Retinogeniculocortical Pathway Induced by Spontaneous Retinal Waves. Journal of Neuroscience, 19 (18), 7951-7970.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The development of the retinogeniculate pathway or the geniculocortical pathway, or both, occurs either before birth or before eye opening in many species. It is widely believed that spontaneous retinal activity could drive the segregation of afferents into eye-specific laminae or columns and the refinement of initially diffuse receptive fields and the emergence of orderly, retinotopic organization. We show that a recent computational model that generates a phenomenologically accurate representation of spontaneous retinal activity can indeed drive afferent segregation and, more particularly, topographic and receptive field refinement in the retinogeniculocortical system. We use a model of anatomical synaptic plasticity based on recent data suggesting that afferents might compete for limited amounts of retrograde neurotrophic factors (NTFs). We find that afferent segregation and receptive field formation are disrupted in the presence of exogenous NTFs. We thus predict that infusion of NTFs into the lateral geniculate nucleus should disrupt normal development and that the infusion of such factors into the striate cortex should disrupt receptive field refinement in addition to the well known disruption of ocular dominance column (ODC) formation. To demonstrate that the capacity of our model of plasticity to drive normal development is not restricted just to spontaneous retinal activity, we also use a coarse representation of visually evoked activity in some simulations. We find that such simulations can exhibit the formation of ODCs followed by their disappearance, reminiscent of the New World marmoset. A decrease in interocular correlations stabilizes these ODCs. Thus we predict that divergent strabismus should render marmoset ODCs stable into adulthood. Key words: spontaneous retinal activity; neurotrophic interactions; ocular dominance columns; receptive field refinement; neuronal development; lateral geniculate nucleus; striate cortex; mathematical models

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Published date: September 1999
Keywords: spontaneous retinal activity, neurotrophic interactions, ocular dominance columns, receptive field refinement, neuronal development, lateral geniculate nucleus, striate cortex, mathematical models
Organisations: Web & Internet Science

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Local EPrints ID: 254183
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/254183
PURE UUID: 81e3bd0e-90b6-4e6f-993c-23e1df2dc504

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Date deposited: 15 Nov 2000
Last modified: 25 Nov 2019 21:10

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