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Statins and bone morphogenetic proteins: new pathways in bone formation

Statins and bone morphogenetic proteins: new pathways in bone formation
Statins and bone morphogenetic proteins: new pathways in bone formation
Introduction: Osteoporosis is a major public health problem leading to morbidity and mortality in many individuals. Treatment for osteoporosis has generally relied on mechanisms that decrease osteoclastic bone resorption. This review outlines new evidence that the cholesterol synthetic pathway may be important in bone metabolism and that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors or statins may increase bone formation.
Results: An experimental observation reported that statins increase bone formation in rodents and that statins have an important role for the cholesterol synthetic pathway in bone formation. This may be via potent bone-forming growth factors, the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Subsequent epidemiological studies (including a meta-analysis of 8 studies) have suggested that statin use may be associated with increased bone mineral density (BMD) and decreased fracture risk in humans. However, more recently published studies have challenged the effect on fracture risk.
Conclusion: The effect of statins on bone mineral density and fracture risk in retrospective studies suggests an exciting new direction for research in bone formation that may lead to advances in the therapy of osteoporosis.
3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, bone mineral density, cholesterol, fracture, osteoporosis
245-247
Edwards, C.J.
dcb27fec-75ea-4575-a844-3588bcf14106
Edwards, C.J.
dcb27fec-75ea-4575-a844-3588bcf14106

Edwards, C.J. (2002) Statins and bone morphogenetic proteins: new pathways in bone formation. Annals Academy of Medicine Singapore, 31 (2), 245-247.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduction: Osteoporosis is a major public health problem leading to morbidity and mortality in many individuals. Treatment for osteoporosis has generally relied on mechanisms that decrease osteoclastic bone resorption. This review outlines new evidence that the cholesterol synthetic pathway may be important in bone metabolism and that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors or statins may increase bone formation.
Results: An experimental observation reported that statins increase bone formation in rodents and that statins have an important role for the cholesterol synthetic pathway in bone formation. This may be via potent bone-forming growth factors, the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Subsequent epidemiological studies (including a meta-analysis of 8 studies) have suggested that statin use may be associated with increased bone mineral density (BMD) and decreased fracture risk in humans. However, more recently published studies have challenged the effect on fracture risk.
Conclusion: The effect of statins on bone mineral density and fracture risk in retrospective studies suggests an exciting new direction for research in bone formation that may lead to advances in the therapy of osteoporosis.

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More information

Published date: 2002
Additional Information: Commentary
Keywords: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, bone mineral density, cholesterol, fracture, osteoporosis

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Local EPrints ID: 25433
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/25433
PURE UUID: b18be6c6-cd09-4072-bfd0-25027cd8d2a5

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Date deposited: 06 Apr 2006
Last modified: 25 Sep 2018 16:31

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