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Embedded Systems Design in the UK: Special Issue

Embedded Systems Design in the UK: Special Issue
Embedded Systems Design in the UK: Special Issue
Guest Editor Introduction Scientific and commercial interest in the development of systematic and concurrent design techniques for embedded systems have risen significantly in recent years driven by numerous factors including cost, performance and shrinking time-to-market constraints of consumer and automotive electronics. This special issue reflects some of the latest developments and practices in embedded system design in UK universities. The aim of this special issue is to provide a focused and up-to-date coverage of the UK research activities in this dynamic and important field of research. It is hoped that this coverage will provide useful information to the research community as well as opportunities to possible collaboration between UK, Europe and USA universities and industries. This special issue of Design Automation for Embedded Systems includes seven papers describing recent research in hardware-software co-design CAD tools, embedded systems application and formal verification. Some of the papers are extended versions of selected papers from the IEE Workshop on Hardware-Software Co-Design, held in London, December 2000. All papers submitted to the special issue have been thoroughly reviewed and revised before acceptance. The first paper, ? HASoC- Towards a New Method for System-on-a-Chip Development?, by P. Green, M. Edwards, and S. Essa, UMIST, presents a methodology for developing embedded systems targeting SoC implementation, emphasizing reuse of existing hardware and software cores. The second paper, ? A System-based Approach to the Formal Development of Embedded Controllers for a Railway?, by M. Butler, University of Southampton, describes a formal approach to the development of embedded controllers for a railway, starting with a system-level specification. The B method is used as the formal notation and methodology. The next two papers deal with software tools for hardware-software co-design. The third paper, ? A Compositional Framework for Hardware-Software Co-Design?, by A. Cau, R. Hale, J. Dimitrov, H. Zedan, and B. Moszkowski, De Montfort University, and M. Manjunathaiah, and M. Spivey, Oxford University describes a framework, which integrates formal verification with traditional design flow of embedded systems. Two case studies are used to illustrate the presented framework. The fourth paper, ?Synthesizing Energy-Efficient Embedded Systems with LOPOCOS?, by M. Schmitz, B.M. Al-Hashimi, University of Southampton, and P. Eles, Linkoping University, Sweden, introduces a prototype CAD tool, Low Power Co-Synthesis (LOPOCOS), which targets the design of energy-efficient heterogeneous embedded systems containing dynamic voltage scalable (DVS) processors. A number of design examples are given including a real-life example illustrating the capabilities of the tool. The fifth paper, ?Comparing Three Heuristic Search Methods for Functional Partitioning in Hardware-Software Co-Design?, by T. Wiangtong, P. Cheung, and W. Luk, Imperial College, provides a systematic comparison between three heuristic search algorithms: genetic algorithms, simulated annealing, and tabu search, for hardware-software partitioning problem, and report on their solutions quality, search time, and how they can be improved. The last two papers address applications of embedded systems. The sixth paper, ? CADRE: An Asynchronous Embedded DSP for Mobile Phone Applications?, by M. Lewis, and L. Brackenbury, University of Manchester, describes an efficient design flow for the development of configurable asynchronous DSP for reduced energy (CADRE), low power IP block intended for digital mobile phone chipsets applications. The last paper, ? Enhanced Image Detection on an ARM Based Embedded System? by J. R. Evans, and T. Arslan, University of Edinburgh, presents the development of a low complexity image recognition technique for automatic optical inspection system targeting an embedded SoC system based on ARM7 target processor. The capabilities of the system are illustrated through practical examples. I would like to sincerely thank all the authors for submitting their papers and the reviewers for keeping up with the very tight schedule that allowed us to complete this special issue as planned in less than a year. Also, I would like to thank Prof. W. Wolf for his invitation to organize this special issue and Kluwer Academic Publishers staff particularly M. de Jongh and C. Knight for helping me with the administration. Bashir Al-Hashimi Guest Editor University of Southampton, UK
Al-Hashimi, Bashir
fccbe873-29ff-4f4b-afd9-d28cda41dd62
Al-Hashimi, Bashir
fccbe873-29ff-4f4b-afd9-d28cda41dd62

(2002) Embedded Systems Design in the UK: Special Issue. Al-Hashimi, Bashir (ed.)

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

Guest Editor Introduction Scientific and commercial interest in the development of systematic and concurrent design techniques for embedded systems have risen significantly in recent years driven by numerous factors including cost, performance and shrinking time-to-market constraints of consumer and automotive electronics. This special issue reflects some of the latest developments and practices in embedded system design in UK universities. The aim of this special issue is to provide a focused and up-to-date coverage of the UK research activities in this dynamic and important field of research. It is hoped that this coverage will provide useful information to the research community as well as opportunities to possible collaboration between UK, Europe and USA universities and industries. This special issue of Design Automation for Embedded Systems includes seven papers describing recent research in hardware-software co-design CAD tools, embedded systems application and formal verification. Some of the papers are extended versions of selected papers from the IEE Workshop on Hardware-Software Co-Design, held in London, December 2000. All papers submitted to the special issue have been thoroughly reviewed and revised before acceptance. The first paper, ? HASoC- Towards a New Method for System-on-a-Chip Development?, by P. Green, M. Edwards, and S. Essa, UMIST, presents a methodology for developing embedded systems targeting SoC implementation, emphasizing reuse of existing hardware and software cores. The second paper, ? A System-based Approach to the Formal Development of Embedded Controllers for a Railway?, by M. Butler, University of Southampton, describes a formal approach to the development of embedded controllers for a railway, starting with a system-level specification. The B method is used as the formal notation and methodology. The next two papers deal with software tools for hardware-software co-design. The third paper, ? A Compositional Framework for Hardware-Software Co-Design?, by A. Cau, R. Hale, J. Dimitrov, H. Zedan, and B. Moszkowski, De Montfort University, and M. Manjunathaiah, and M. Spivey, Oxford University describes a framework, which integrates formal verification with traditional design flow of embedded systems. Two case studies are used to illustrate the presented framework. The fourth paper, ?Synthesizing Energy-Efficient Embedded Systems with LOPOCOS?, by M. Schmitz, B.M. Al-Hashimi, University of Southampton, and P. Eles, Linkoping University, Sweden, introduces a prototype CAD tool, Low Power Co-Synthesis (LOPOCOS), which targets the design of energy-efficient heterogeneous embedded systems containing dynamic voltage scalable (DVS) processors. A number of design examples are given including a real-life example illustrating the capabilities of the tool. The fifth paper, ?Comparing Three Heuristic Search Methods for Functional Partitioning in Hardware-Software Co-Design?, by T. Wiangtong, P. Cheung, and W. Luk, Imperial College, provides a systematic comparison between three heuristic search algorithms: genetic algorithms, simulated annealing, and tabu search, for hardware-software partitioning problem, and report on their solutions quality, search time, and how they can be improved. The last two papers address applications of embedded systems. The sixth paper, ? CADRE: An Asynchronous Embedded DSP for Mobile Phone Applications?, by M. Lewis, and L. Brackenbury, University of Manchester, describes an efficient design flow for the development of configurable asynchronous DSP for reduced energy (CADRE), low power IP block intended for digital mobile phone chipsets applications. The last paper, ? Enhanced Image Detection on an ARM Based Embedded System? by J. R. Evans, and T. Arslan, University of Edinburgh, presents the development of a low complexity image recognition technique for automatic optical inspection system targeting an embedded SoC system based on ARM7 target processor. The capabilities of the system are illustrated through practical examples. I would like to sincerely thank all the authors for submitting their papers and the reviewers for keeping up with the very tight schedule that allowed us to complete this special issue as planned in less than a year. Also, I would like to thank Prof. W. Wolf for his invitation to organize this special issue and Kluwer Academic Publishers staff particularly M. de Jongh and C. Knight for helping me with the administration. Bashir Al-Hashimi Guest Editor University of Southampton, UK

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More information

Published date: October 2002
Additional Information: Special Issue. Address: Kluwer International Journal: Design Automation for Embedded Systems
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science

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Local EPrints ID: 256639
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/256639
PURE UUID: d07728e9-460f-4337-9078-4850d095eb33

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Date deposited: 24 Jun 2002
Last modified: 29 Jan 2020 15:26

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