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Human Identification by Spatio-Temporal Symmetry

Human Identification by Spatio-Temporal Symmetry
Human Identification by Spatio-Temporal Symmetry
We describe spatio-temporal symmetry and its extraction via a Generalised Symmetry Operator. Its use in gait recognition is reinforced by the view from psychology that human gait is a symmetrical pattern of motion. We show that by including temporal information in our symmetry calculations we are not recognizing people by their body shape but also by their motion. Here, the new technique is applied to a database of 28 subjects, which equals in size the largest contemporaneous gait databases. The results of the new approach agree with earlier results that the symmetrical properties of human gait appear to be unique and can indeed be used for analysis and for recognition. The results achieved so far give promising performance and higher recognition rates than those of an earlier spatial approach. Performance analyses suggest that symmetry enjoys practical advantages such as ability to handle noise and occlusion, and especially when resolution is too low for other biometrics to be deployed.
Gait, Biometrics, Symmetry
632-635
Hayfron-Acquah, James
39f52851-87b0-4842-a047-047116422ed9
Nixon, Mark S.
2b5b9804-5a81-462a-82e6-92ee5fa74e12
Carter, John N.
e05be2f9-991d-4476-bb50-ae91606389da
Hayfron-Acquah, James
39f52851-87b0-4842-a047-047116422ed9
Nixon, Mark S.
2b5b9804-5a81-462a-82e6-92ee5fa74e12
Carter, John N.
e05be2f9-991d-4476-bb50-ae91606389da

Hayfron-Acquah, James, Nixon, Mark S. and Carter, John N. (2002) Human Identification by Spatio-Temporal Symmetry. International Conference on Pattern Recognition. pp. 632-635 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

We describe spatio-temporal symmetry and its extraction via a Generalised Symmetry Operator. Its use in gait recognition is reinforced by the view from psychology that human gait is a symmetrical pattern of motion. We show that by including temporal information in our symmetry calculations we are not recognizing people by their body shape but also by their motion. Here, the new technique is applied to a database of 28 subjects, which equals in size the largest contemporaneous gait databases. The results of the new approach agree with earlier results that the symmetrical properties of human gait appear to be unique and can indeed be used for analysis and for recognition. The results achieved so far give promising performance and higher recognition rates than those of an earlier spatial approach. Performance analyses suggest that symmetry enjoys practical advantages such as ability to handle noise and occlusion, and especially when resolution is too low for other biometrics to be deployed.

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More information

Published date: 2002
Additional Information: Event Dates: Aug 2002
Venue - Dates: International Conference on Pattern Recognition, 2002-08-01
Keywords: Gait, Biometrics, Symmetry
Organisations: Southampton Wireless Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 256991
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/256991
PURE UUID: 2f07a7b6-1d0d-4ac2-89c3-20b3304f0a46
ORCID for Mark S. Nixon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9174-5934

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Nov 2003
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 02:07

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