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The influence of morphology on electrical treeing in polyethylene blends

The influence of morphology on electrical treeing in polyethylene blends
The influence of morphology on electrical treeing in polyethylene blends
The effect of morphology on the development of electrical trees in semicrystalline polymers has been investigated using a blend of high and low density polyethylene and, for comparison, a low density polyethylene. In the blend system, which contained 20% high density polyethylene and 80% of the above low density polyethylene, thermal processing was used to generate a variety of morphologies. Quenching directly from the melt gave a fine-scale banded spherulitic morphology, isothermal crystallization at 115 deg.C gave a continuous, coarse banded spherulitic morphology, whereas crystallization at 124 deg.C, and above, produced discrete and relatively compact lamellar aggregates of high density polyethylene within a low density matrix. The morphology of the low density polyethylene was characterized by fine-scale banded spherulites. The growth of electrical trees was studied in these materials as a function of the applied ac electrical stress. In the low density material and the blend materials, the rate of development of these structures was found to follow the well-known sigmoidal time dependence, where the increasing fractal dimension (branch density) of the growing tree structure is coupled with a decrease in the tree growth rate with increasing applied voltage. This leads to a local maximum and local minimum in the average growth rates as a function of applied voltage. At all applied voltages, the tree growth rates were found to depend not only on the degree of crystallinity but also on the uniformity of the crystalline phase. Tree growth rates were greatest for LDPE and the quenched blend material and a minimum for the blend material crystallized at 115 deg.C. The high density inclusions formed at crystallization temperatures of 124 and 125 deg.C, acted as barriers to the tree growth and resulted in average tree growth rates between the quenched and the 115 deg.C blend materials.
58-64
Dodd, S. J.
a9916381-232d-40ce-a90f-e11de356dca6
Champion, J. V.
dddc1cdd-7ce3-4642-a549-7c5b376b47ba
Vaughan, A. S.
6d813b66-17f9-4864-9763-25a6d659d8a3
Sutton, S.J.
571c7136-1eb6-44e1-8979-ca0829469a6b
Swingler, S. G.
4f13fbb2-7d2e-480a-8687-acea6a4ed735
Dodd, S. J.
a9916381-232d-40ce-a90f-e11de356dca6
Champion, J. V.
dddc1cdd-7ce3-4642-a549-7c5b376b47ba
Vaughan, A. S.
6d813b66-17f9-4864-9763-25a6d659d8a3
Sutton, S.J.
571c7136-1eb6-44e1-8979-ca0829469a6b
Swingler, S. G.
4f13fbb2-7d2e-480a-8687-acea6a4ed735

Dodd, S. J., Champion, J. V., Vaughan, A. S., Sutton, S.J. and Swingler, S. G. (2003) The influence of morphology on electrical treeing in polyethylene blends. IEEE Proceedings Science Measurement and Technology, 150 (2), 58-64.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The effect of morphology on the development of electrical trees in semicrystalline polymers has been investigated using a blend of high and low density polyethylene and, for comparison, a low density polyethylene. In the blend system, which contained 20% high density polyethylene and 80% of the above low density polyethylene, thermal processing was used to generate a variety of morphologies. Quenching directly from the melt gave a fine-scale banded spherulitic morphology, isothermal crystallization at 115 deg.C gave a continuous, coarse banded spherulitic morphology, whereas crystallization at 124 deg.C, and above, produced discrete and relatively compact lamellar aggregates of high density polyethylene within a low density matrix. The morphology of the low density polyethylene was characterized by fine-scale banded spherulites. The growth of electrical trees was studied in these materials as a function of the applied ac electrical stress. In the low density material and the blend materials, the rate of development of these structures was found to follow the well-known sigmoidal time dependence, where the increasing fractal dimension (branch density) of the growing tree structure is coupled with a decrease in the tree growth rate with increasing applied voltage. This leads to a local maximum and local minimum in the average growth rates as a function of applied voltage. At all applied voltages, the tree growth rates were found to depend not only on the degree of crystallinity but also on the uniformity of the crystalline phase. Tree growth rates were greatest for LDPE and the quenched blend material and a minimum for the blend material crystallized at 115 deg.C. The high density inclusions formed at crystallization temperatures of 124 and 125 deg.C, acted as barriers to the tree growth and resulted in average tree growth rates between the quenched and the 115 deg.C blend materials.

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More information

Published date: March 2003
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science, EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 257575
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/257575
PURE UUID: 04626286-ed22-4ea8-b85e-a74f9600479d
ORCID for A. S. Vaughan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0535-513X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Mar 2004
Last modified: 09 May 2019 00:36

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