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Fetal Origins of Adult Disease. A hypothesis about a mechanism for the programming of blood pressure and vascular disease in early life

Martyn, C.N. and Greenwald, S.E. (2001) Fetal Origins of Adult Disease. A hypothesis about a mechanism for the programming of blood pressure and vascular disease in early life Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, 28, (11), pp. 948-951. (doi:10.1046/j.1440-1681.2001.03555.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

1. There is now a great deal of evidence that people whose weight at birth was low tend to have higher blood pressure and increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease as adults.
2. We argue that, in fetuses whose growth is impaired, synthesis of elastin in the walls of the aorta and large arteries is deficient and that this deficiency leads to permanent changes in the mechanical properties of these vessels.
3. Over a lifetime, such changes could predispose an individual to higher blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

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More information

Published date: 2001
Keywords: blood pressure, elastin, fetal growth, programming, vascular structure

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 25789
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/25789
ISSN: 0305-1870
PURE UUID: 361b9b39-c788-4d8f-b9a1-f14965aa3fd1

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Date deposited: 21 Apr 2006
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 16:09

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Contributors

Author: C.N. Martyn
Author: S.E. Greenwald

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