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Developing multiagent systems: the Gaia Methodology

Developing multiagent systems: the Gaia Methodology
Developing multiagent systems: the Gaia Methodology
Systems composed of interacting autonomous agents offer a promising software engineering approach for developing applications in complex domains. However, this multiagent system paradigm introduces a number of new abstractions and design/development issues when compared with more traditional approaches to software development. Accordingly, new analysis and design methodologies, as well as new tools, are needed to effectively engineer such systems. Against this background, the contribution of this paper is twofold. First, we synthesize and clarify the key abstractions of agent-based computing as they pertain to agent-oriented software engineering. In particular, we argue that a multiagent system can naturally be viewed and architected as a computational organization, and we identify the appropriate organizational abstractions that are central to the analysis and design of such systems. Second, we detail and extend the Gaia methodology for the analysis and design of multiagent systems. Gaia exploits the aforementioned organizational abstractions to provide clear guidelines for the analysis and design of complex and open software systems. Two representative case studies are introduced to exemplify Gaia’s concepts and to show its use and effectiveness in different types of multiagent system.
317-370
Zambonelli, F.
ab093383-4d27-44eb-8776-c5961793eedd
Jennings, N. R.
ab3d94cc-247c-4545-9d1e-65873d6cdb30
Wooldridge, M.
955b6c39-0d07-430e-b68d-b9a96d6e14e7
Zambonelli, F.
ab093383-4d27-44eb-8776-c5961793eedd
Jennings, N. R.
ab3d94cc-247c-4545-9d1e-65873d6cdb30
Wooldridge, M.
955b6c39-0d07-430e-b68d-b9a96d6e14e7

Zambonelli, F., Jennings, N. R. and Wooldridge, M. (2003) Developing multiagent systems: the Gaia Methodology. ACM Transactions on Software Engineering and Methodology, 12 (3), 317-370.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Systems composed of interacting autonomous agents offer a promising software engineering approach for developing applications in complex domains. However, this multiagent system paradigm introduces a number of new abstractions and design/development issues when compared with more traditional approaches to software development. Accordingly, new analysis and design methodologies, as well as new tools, are needed to effectively engineer such systems. Against this background, the contribution of this paper is twofold. First, we synthesize and clarify the key abstractions of agent-based computing as they pertain to agent-oriented software engineering. In particular, we argue that a multiagent system can naturally be viewed and architected as a computational organization, and we identify the appropriate organizational abstractions that are central to the analysis and design of such systems. Second, we detail and extend the Gaia methodology for the analysis and design of multiagent systems. Gaia exploits the aforementioned organizational abstractions to provide clear guidelines for the analysis and design of complex and open software systems. Two representative case studies are introduced to exemplify Gaia’s concepts and to show its use and effectiveness in different types of multiagent system.

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Published date: 2003
Organisations: Agents, Interactions & Complexity

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Local EPrints ID: 258540
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/258540
PURE UUID: 39622a7f-5407-4e02-bd24-ead4e901dffa

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Date deposited: 14 Nov 2003
Last modified: 16 Dec 2019 20:45

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