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Agent-based Semantic Web Services

Agent-based Semantic Web Services
Agent-based Semantic Web Services
The Web Services world consists of loosely-coupled distributed systems which adapt to changes by the use of service descriptions that enable ad-hoc, opportunistic service discovery and reuse. At present, these service descriptions are semantically impoverished, being concerned with describing the functional signature of the services rather than characterising their meaning. In the Semantic Web community, the DAML Services effort attempts to rectify this by providing a more expressive way of describing Web services using ontologies. However, this approach does not separate the domain-neutral communicative intent of a message (considered in terms of speech acts) from its domain-specific content, unlike similar developments from the multi-agent systems community. We describe our experiences of designing and building an ontologically motivated Web Services system for situational awareness and information triage in a simulated humanitarian aid scenario. In particular, we discuss the merits of using techniques from the multi-agent systems community for separating the intentional force of messages from their content, and the implementation of these techniques within the DAML Services model.
Web Services, Semantic Web, DAML-S, Agent Communication Languages, Ontologies
1570-8268
141-154
Gibbins, Nicholas
98efd447-4aa7-411c-86d1-955a612eceac
Harris, Stephen
a204fb8c-c838-4fc9-b248-0dbced721eeb
Shadbolt, Nigel
5c5acdf4-ad42-49b6-81fe-e9db58c2caf7
Gibbins, Nicholas
98efd447-4aa7-411c-86d1-955a612eceac
Harris, Stephen
a204fb8c-c838-4fc9-b248-0dbced721eeb
Shadbolt, Nigel
5c5acdf4-ad42-49b6-81fe-e9db58c2caf7

Gibbins, Nicholas, Harris, Stephen and Shadbolt, Nigel (2003) Agent-based Semantic Web Services. Web Semantics, 1 (2), 141-154.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The Web Services world consists of loosely-coupled distributed systems which adapt to changes by the use of service descriptions that enable ad-hoc, opportunistic service discovery and reuse. At present, these service descriptions are semantically impoverished, being concerned with describing the functional signature of the services rather than characterising their meaning. In the Semantic Web community, the DAML Services effort attempts to rectify this by providing a more expressive way of describing Web services using ontologies. However, this approach does not separate the domain-neutral communicative intent of a message (considered in terms of speech acts) from its domain-specific content, unlike similar developments from the multi-agent systems community. We describe our experiences of designing and building an ontologically motivated Web Services system for situational awareness and information triage in a simulated humanitarian aid scenario. In particular, we discuss the merits of using techniques from the multi-agent systems community for separating the intentional force of messages from their content, and the implementation of these techniques within the DAML Services model.

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Published date: 2003
Keywords: Web Services, Semantic Web, DAML-S, Agent Communication Languages, Ontologies
Organisations: Web & Internet Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 258692
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/258692
ISSN: 1570-8268
PURE UUID: b85ef07c-7c3b-48cd-a69b-e281415bfedb
ORCID for Nicholas Gibbins: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6140-9956

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Jan 2005
Last modified: 19 Nov 2019 01:54

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