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Risk of hand-arm vibration syndrome according to occupation and sources of exposure to hand-transmitted vibration: A national survey

Risk of hand-arm vibration syndrome according to occupation and sources of exposure to hand-transmitted vibration: A national survey
Risk of hand-arm vibration syndrome according to occupation and sources of exposure to hand-transmitted vibration: A national survey
Background: Although some occupational sources of hand-transmitted vibration (HTV) have been extensively investigated, the risks associated with others are poorly characterized.
Methods: A questionnaire was mailed to a community sample of 12,240 men aged 16- 64 years and 906 men from the armed forces. Questions covered current occupation, sources of HTV, numbness or tingling in the fingers in the past week, and finger blanching. In the 5,364 respondents who had been at work in the past week, associations between symptoms and exposures were examined by logistic regression, with odds ratios converted into prevalence ratios (PRs).
Results: Altogether, 513 men (10%) reported cold-induced finger blanching and 769 (14%) sensory symptoms in the fingers. The risk of blanching was increased in builders (PR 2.4, 95% CI 1.0-5.2), carpenters and joiners (PR 1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.4), motor mechanics (PR 2.3, 95% CI 1.1-4.6), and laborers (PR 2.8, 95% CI 1.3-6.0); while the risk of sensory symptoms was elevated in laborers (PR 4.0, 95% CI 2.3-6.6) and plant operatives (PR 3.5, 95% CI 1.9-5.9). Use of hand-guided mowers, concrete breakers, chain saws, and jig saws was significantly associated with symptoms.
Conclusions: Little attention has been paid to the risks of vibration injury in construction workers, woodworkers, motor mechanics, and laborers, or to the risks from mowers, jig saws and several other common vibratory tools. These should be a focus for further investigation and preventive measures.
vibration-induced white finger, sensorineural, population, occupational, vibratory tools
0271-3586
389-396
Palmer, Keith T.
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Syddall, Holly E.
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Pannett, Brian
b7b76889-3b34-4d02-9f12-600265cb0048
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Coggon, David
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3
Palmer, Keith T.
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Syddall, Holly E.
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Pannett, Brian
b7b76889-3b34-4d02-9f12-600265cb0048
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Coggon, David
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3

Palmer, Keith T., Griffin, Michael J., Syddall, Holly E., Pannett, Brian, Cooper, Cyrus and Coggon, David (2001) Risk of hand-arm vibration syndrome according to occupation and sources of exposure to hand-transmitted vibration: A national survey. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 39 (4), 389-396. (doi:10.1002/ajim.1029).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Although some occupational sources of hand-transmitted vibration (HTV) have been extensively investigated, the risks associated with others are poorly characterized.
Methods: A questionnaire was mailed to a community sample of 12,240 men aged 16- 64 years and 906 men from the armed forces. Questions covered current occupation, sources of HTV, numbness or tingling in the fingers in the past week, and finger blanching. In the 5,364 respondents who had been at work in the past week, associations between symptoms and exposures were examined by logistic regression, with odds ratios converted into prevalence ratios (PRs).
Results: Altogether, 513 men (10%) reported cold-induced finger blanching and 769 (14%) sensory symptoms in the fingers. The risk of blanching was increased in builders (PR 2.4, 95% CI 1.0-5.2), carpenters and joiners (PR 1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.4), motor mechanics (PR 2.3, 95% CI 1.1-4.6), and laborers (PR 2.8, 95% CI 1.3-6.0); while the risk of sensory symptoms was elevated in laborers (PR 4.0, 95% CI 2.3-6.6) and plant operatives (PR 3.5, 95% CI 1.9-5.9). Use of hand-guided mowers, concrete breakers, chain saws, and jig saws was significantly associated with symptoms.
Conclusions: Little attention has been paid to the risks of vibration injury in construction workers, woodworkers, motor mechanics, and laborers, or to the risks from mowers, jig saws and several other common vibratory tools. These should be a focus for further investigation and preventive measures.

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More information

Published date: 2001
Keywords: vibration-induced white finger, sensorineural, population, occupational, vibratory tools
Organisations: Human Sciences Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 25878
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/25878
ISSN: 0271-3586
PURE UUID: cba12c0a-49f4-470f-a155-c174ef96e41c
ORCID for Michael J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502
ORCID for Holly E. Syddall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0171-0306
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for David Coggon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1930-3987

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Date deposited: 20 Apr 2006
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 01:43

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Contributors

Author: Keith T. Palmer
Author: Michael J. Griffin ORCID iD
Author: Brian Pannett
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: David Coggon ORCID iD

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