The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Raynaud's phenomenon, vibration induced white finger, and difficulties in hearing

Raynaud's phenomenon, vibration induced white finger, and difficulties in hearing
Raynaud's phenomenon, vibration induced white finger, and difficulties in hearing
Background: an association has previously been reported between finger blanching and hearing difficulties, but only in workers with exposure to noise and hand transmitted vibration (HTV).

Aims: to explore the association in a community sample, including cases who lacked occupational exposure to noise or HTV.

Method: a questionnaire was mailed to 12 606 subjects aged 35–64 years, chosen at random from the age–sex registers of 34 British general practices. Inquiry was made about years of employment in noisy jobs, lifetime exposure to HTV, hearing difficulties and tinnitus, and lifetime history of cold induced finger blanching. Subjects were classed as having severe hearing difficulty if they used a hearing aid or found it difficult or impossible to hear conversation in a quiet room. Associations of finger blanching with hearing difficulties and tinnitus were analysed by logistic regression.

Results: Among 8193 respondents were 185 who reported severe hearing difficulty and 1151 who reported finger blanching. After adjustment for age and years of work in noisy jobs, hearing difficulty was about twice as common in men and women who reported finger blanching, including those who had never been importantly exposed to noise and in those never exposed to HTV.

Conclusions: these data support an association between finger blanching and hearing loss, which is not explained by confounding occupational exposure to noise, and suggest that it may extend to causes of blanching other than vibration induced white finger. Further investigations are warranted to confirm the association and explore possible mechanisms, such as sympathetic vasoconstriction in the cochlea.
1351-0711
640-642
Palmer, Keith T.
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Syddall, Holly E.
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Pannett, B.
1799085b-0c63-4d72-903c-edea48bacb9f
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Coggon, D.
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3
Palmer, Keith T.
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Syddall, Holly E.
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Pannett, B.
1799085b-0c63-4d72-903c-edea48bacb9f
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Coggon, D.
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3

Palmer, Keith T., Griffin, Michael J., Syddall, Holly E., Pannett, B., Cooper, Cyrus and Coggon, D. (2002) Raynaud's phenomenon, vibration induced white finger, and difficulties in hearing. Occupational & Environmental Medicine, 59 (9), 640-642. (doi:10.1136/oem.59.9.640).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: an association has previously been reported between finger blanching and hearing difficulties, but only in workers with exposure to noise and hand transmitted vibration (HTV).

Aims: to explore the association in a community sample, including cases who lacked occupational exposure to noise or HTV.

Method: a questionnaire was mailed to 12 606 subjects aged 35–64 years, chosen at random from the age–sex registers of 34 British general practices. Inquiry was made about years of employment in noisy jobs, lifetime exposure to HTV, hearing difficulties and tinnitus, and lifetime history of cold induced finger blanching. Subjects were classed as having severe hearing difficulty if they used a hearing aid or found it difficult or impossible to hear conversation in a quiet room. Associations of finger blanching with hearing difficulties and tinnitus were analysed by logistic regression.

Results: Among 8193 respondents were 185 who reported severe hearing difficulty and 1151 who reported finger blanching. After adjustment for age and years of work in noisy jobs, hearing difficulty was about twice as common in men and women who reported finger blanching, including those who had never been importantly exposed to noise and in those never exposed to HTV.

Conclusions: these data support an association between finger blanching and hearing loss, which is not explained by confounding occupational exposure to noise, and suggest that it may extend to causes of blanching other than vibration induced white finger. Further investigations are warranted to confirm the association and explore possible mechanisms, such as sympathetic vasoconstriction in the cochlea.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: 2002
Organisations: Human Sciences Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 25881
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/25881
ISSN: 1351-0711
PURE UUID: 65e8aa00-657d-4a8b-9529-e3890821df60
ORCID for Michael J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502
ORCID for Holly E. Syddall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0171-0306
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for D. Coggon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1930-3987

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Apr 2006
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 02:56

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Keith T. Palmer
Author: B. Pannett
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: D. Coggon ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×