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Utility of restricted neck movement as a diagnostic criterion in case definition for neck disorders

Utility of restricted neck movement as a diagnostic criterion in case definition for neck disorders
Utility of restricted neck movement as a diagnostic criterion in case definition for neck disorders
Objectives: This study explored the utility of restricted neck movement in epidemiologic case definition for neck disorders.
Methods: Data on neck pain, sensory symptoms in the arm, psychosocial and physical risk factors for neck disorders, and the range of active neck movements were obtained through a self-administered questionnaire, interview, and physical examination for a community-based sample of 2145 adults aged 25–64 years. The prevalence of neck pain and sensory symptoms was examined according to the extent of neck movements. Logistic regression was used to assess the relation of risk factors to neck disorders, defined by various combinations of pain and restricted movement, and the associations were compared.
Results: The ranges of different categories of neck movement were correlated within persons, and their sum (“total neck movement”) was unimodally distributed across persons. The prevalence of neck pain and sensory symptoms was elevated when total neck movement was below the 30th centile, and particularly below the 10th centile. Associations between neck pain and low vitality and poor support at work were stronger when there was also restricted neck movement, but the extent of neck movement did not materially modify the relation of neck pain to physical risk factors.
Conclusions: The restriction of total neck movement may serve as a marker of severity in community-based studies of neck disorders, but no indication was found that it distinguishes a subset of cases with a distinct etiology.
case definition, diagnosis, diagnostic criterion, neck disorder, physical activity, psychosocial risk factor, restricted neck movement, risk factor
387-393
Reading, I.
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Walker-Bone, K.E.
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Palmer, K.T.
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Cooper, C.
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Coggon, D.
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Reading, I.
6f832276-87b7-4a76-a9ed-b4b3df0a3f66
Walker-Bone, K.E.
ad7d1336-ed2c-4f39-ade5-da84eb412109
Palmer, K.T.
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Coggon, D.
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3

Reading, I., Walker-Bone, K.E., Palmer, K.T., Cooper, C. and Coggon, D. (2005) Utility of restricted neck movement as a diagnostic criterion in case definition for neck disorders. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health, 31 (5), 387-393.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: This study explored the utility of restricted neck movement in epidemiologic case definition for neck disorders.
Methods: Data on neck pain, sensory symptoms in the arm, psychosocial and physical risk factors for neck disorders, and the range of active neck movements were obtained through a self-administered questionnaire, interview, and physical examination for a community-based sample of 2145 adults aged 25–64 years. The prevalence of neck pain and sensory symptoms was examined according to the extent of neck movements. Logistic regression was used to assess the relation of risk factors to neck disorders, defined by various combinations of pain and restricted movement, and the associations were compared.
Results: The ranges of different categories of neck movement were correlated within persons, and their sum (“total neck movement”) was unimodally distributed across persons. The prevalence of neck pain and sensory symptoms was elevated when total neck movement was below the 30th centile, and particularly below the 10th centile. Associations between neck pain and low vitality and poor support at work were stronger when there was also restricted neck movement, but the extent of neck movement did not materially modify the relation of neck pain to physical risk factors.
Conclusions: The restriction of total neck movement may serve as a marker of severity in community-based studies of neck disorders, but no indication was found that it distinguishes a subset of cases with a distinct etiology.

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More information

Published date: 2005
Keywords: case definition, diagnosis, diagnostic criterion, neck disorder, physical activity, psychosocial risk factor, restricted neck movement, risk factor

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 25928
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/25928
PURE UUID: dbb6c8fd-787c-4529-8c7b-bc63e0606908
ORCID for I. Reading: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1457-6532
ORCID for K.E. Walker-Bone: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5992-1459
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for D. Coggon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1930-3987

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Apr 2006
Last modified: 08 Jan 2022 02:51

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Contributors

Author: I. Reading ORCID iD
Author: K.T. Palmer
Author: C. Cooper ORCID iD
Author: D. Coggon ORCID iD

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