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Electrostatic charging of trigger actuated spray devices

Electrostatic charging of trigger actuated spray devices
Electrostatic charging of trigger actuated spray devices
Electrostatic charging has long been used to improve the efficiency of a range of sprayed liquids. However, the benefits have not until recently been available for exploitation by domestic sprays due to the need for a high voltage power supply. A minimum charge-to-mass ratio (q/m) of 1 ? 10-4 C/kg is generally considered necessary to elicit electrostatic benefits. This level of charge can now be imparted to liquids atomised from trigger-actuated spray devices by a passive system, requiring no power supply. Induction charging was achieved using a triboelectrically charged aluminium electrode. The q/m of the sprayed liquid was dependent upon the charge residing on the induction electrode. The induction electrode was electrically isolated and required a charge of between 0.7 and 1.3 ? 10-8 C to deliver a water spray with a q/m of 1 ? 10-4 C/kg. This level of static charge was readily attained by tribocharging the aluminium with polythene. Once generated, sufficient charge remained on the electrode surface to charge successive sprays without the need for regeneration. The performance advantages for a spray charged in this manner include attraction to and targeting of surfaces and wrap-around onto surfaces not in the direct line of sight.
0 7603 0949 0
59-64
Institute of Physics Publishing
Gaunt, L.F.
a93a9844-2a31-4636-b896-4eb7a9d6c5fe
Hughes, J.F.
d6a276c8-a7e5-46d9-9b3a-e7be07d4ddfc
Morgan, H.
Gaunt, L.F.
a93a9844-2a31-4636-b896-4eb7a9d6c5fe
Hughes, J.F.
d6a276c8-a7e5-46d9-9b3a-e7be07d4ddfc
Morgan, H.

Gaunt, L.F. and Hughes, J.F. (2003) Electrostatic charging of trigger actuated spray devices. Morgan, H. (ed.) In Electrostatics 2003. Institute of Physics Publishing. pp. 59-64 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Electrostatic charging has long been used to improve the efficiency of a range of sprayed liquids. However, the benefits have not until recently been available for exploitation by domestic sprays due to the need for a high voltage power supply. A minimum charge-to-mass ratio (q/m) of 1 ? 10-4 C/kg is generally considered necessary to elicit electrostatic benefits. This level of charge can now be imparted to liquids atomised from trigger-actuated spray devices by a passive system, requiring no power supply. Induction charging was achieved using a triboelectrically charged aluminium electrode. The q/m of the sprayed liquid was dependent upon the charge residing on the induction electrode. The induction electrode was electrically isolated and required a charge of between 0.7 and 1.3 ? 10-8 C to deliver a water spray with a q/m of 1 ? 10-4 C/kg. This level of static charge was readily attained by tribocharging the aluminium with polythene. Once generated, sufficient charge remained on the electrode surface to charge successive sprays without the need for regeneration. The performance advantages for a spray charged in this manner include attraction to and targeting of surfaces and wrap-around onto surfaces not in the direct line of sight.

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More information

Published date: 2003
Venue - Dates: Institute of Physics Electrostatics 2003, United Kingdom, 2003-03-23 - 2003-03-27
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 259386
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/259386
ISBN: 0 7603 0949 0
PURE UUID: 87f3a19b-3b25-4cb9-8485-04f22d7ee3d7

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 May 2004
Last modified: 29 Jan 2020 15:35

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