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Autotransfusion decreases blood usage following cardiac surgery - a prospective randomized trial

Autotransfusion decreases blood usage following cardiac surgery - a prospective randomized trial
Autotransfusion decreases blood usage following cardiac surgery - a prospective randomized trial
Introduction: 10% of blood issued by the National Blood Service (220 000) is utilised in cardiac procedures. Transfusion reactions, infection risk and cost should stimulate us to decrease this transfusion rate. We tested the efficacy of autotransfusion of washed postoperative mediastinal fluid in a prospective randomized trial.
Patients and methods: 166 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), valve or CABG+valve procedures were randomized into three groups. The indication for transfusion was a postoperative haemoglobin (Hb) <10g/l or a packed cell volume (PCV) <30. When applicable, group A patients received washed post-operative drainage fluid. Group B all received blood processed from the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit following separation from CPB and if appropriate washed post-operative drainage fluid. Group C were controls. Groups were compared using analysis of variance.
Results: There was no significant difference in age, sex, type of operation, CPB time and preoperative Hb and PCV between the groups. Blood requirements were as shown. [see table 3 in main text]
Twelve patients in group A and 10 in group B did not require a homologous transfusion following processing of the mediastinal drainage fluid.
Conclusion: Autotransfusion of washed postoperative mediastinal fluid can decrease the amount of homologous blood transfused following cardiac surgery. There was no demonstrable benefit in processing blood from the CPB circuit as well as mediastinal drainage fluid.
autotransfusion, blood transfusion, mediastinal drainage fluid
0967-2109
184-187
Dalrymple-Hay, Malcolm J.R.
daa13255-f063-4c07-b316-9fd5687251a8
Dawkins, Sam
94a8a85b-17c5-4cb7-925e-3d3a2e4cbbca
Pack, Louise
dab001e0-e0ff-46b4-8b44-d7a1f2c1771a
Deakin, Charles D.
560d993b-bbc9-4548-9990-272ed18a011d
Sheppard, Stuart
7d9513e1-2275-4c2b-b0f1-9a32ee4f37c0
Ohri, Sunil K.
8aa5698c-78cf-4f59-a5af-5afa46f0348c
Haw, Marcus P.
de1cf3ff-7184-4e05-af6b-5a90085a8eba
Livesey, Steven A.
c5d8a3d1-266b-41a4-9165-77c02e13bc6f
Monro, James L.
68cc1066-fb7a-42cb-8d14-d92ee8680ce9
Dalrymple-Hay, Malcolm J.R.
daa13255-f063-4c07-b316-9fd5687251a8
Dawkins, Sam
94a8a85b-17c5-4cb7-925e-3d3a2e4cbbca
Pack, Louise
dab001e0-e0ff-46b4-8b44-d7a1f2c1771a
Deakin, Charles D.
560d993b-bbc9-4548-9990-272ed18a011d
Sheppard, Stuart
7d9513e1-2275-4c2b-b0f1-9a32ee4f37c0
Ohri, Sunil K.
8aa5698c-78cf-4f59-a5af-5afa46f0348c
Haw, Marcus P.
de1cf3ff-7184-4e05-af6b-5a90085a8eba
Livesey, Steven A.
c5d8a3d1-266b-41a4-9165-77c02e13bc6f
Monro, James L.
68cc1066-fb7a-42cb-8d14-d92ee8680ce9

Dalrymple-Hay, Malcolm J.R., Dawkins, Sam, Pack, Louise, Deakin, Charles D., Sheppard, Stuart, Ohri, Sunil K., Haw, Marcus P., Livesey, Steven A. and Monro, James L. (2001) Autotransfusion decreases blood usage following cardiac surgery - a prospective randomized trial. Cardiovascular Surgery, 9 (2), 184-187. (doi:10.1016/S0967-2109(00)00100-9).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduction: 10% of blood issued by the National Blood Service (220 000) is utilised in cardiac procedures. Transfusion reactions, infection risk and cost should stimulate us to decrease this transfusion rate. We tested the efficacy of autotransfusion of washed postoperative mediastinal fluid in a prospective randomized trial.
Patients and methods: 166 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), valve or CABG+valve procedures were randomized into three groups. The indication for transfusion was a postoperative haemoglobin (Hb) <10g/l or a packed cell volume (PCV) <30. When applicable, group A patients received washed post-operative drainage fluid. Group B all received blood processed from the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit following separation from CPB and if appropriate washed post-operative drainage fluid. Group C were controls. Groups were compared using analysis of variance.
Results: There was no significant difference in age, sex, type of operation, CPB time and preoperative Hb and PCV between the groups. Blood requirements were as shown. [see table 3 in main text]
Twelve patients in group A and 10 in group B did not require a homologous transfusion following processing of the mediastinal drainage fluid.
Conclusion: Autotransfusion of washed postoperative mediastinal fluid can decrease the amount of homologous blood transfused following cardiac surgery. There was no demonstrable benefit in processing blood from the CPB circuit as well as mediastinal drainage fluid.

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Published date: 2001
Keywords: autotransfusion, blood transfusion, mediastinal drainage fluid

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Local EPrints ID: 25964
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/25964
ISSN: 0967-2109
PURE UUID: be3c0dff-5a2a-4c48-be4a-c01a4379dbdc

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Date deposited: 24 Apr 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:15

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Author: Malcolm J.R. Dalrymple-Hay
Author: Sam Dawkins
Author: Louise Pack
Author: Stuart Sheppard
Author: Sunil K. Ohri
Author: Marcus P. Haw
Author: Steven A. Livesey
Author: James L. Monro

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