The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Essential fatty acid status in paediatric Crohn's disease: relationship with disease activity and nutritional status

Essential fatty acid status in paediatric Crohn's disease: relationship with disease activity and nutritional status
Essential fatty acid status in paediatric Crohn's disease: relationship with disease activity and nutritional status
Background: Active paediatric Crohn's disease is associated with nutritional deficiencies and altered nutrient intake. The availability of essential fatty acids (linoleic and ?-linolenic acids) or their derivatives (arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids) may alter in plasma and cell membrane phospholipid in protein-energy malnutrition in children and in Crohn's disease in adults.
Aim: To investigate the relationship of fatty acid phospholipid profiles with disease activity and nutritional status in paediatric Crohn's disease.
Methods: The fatty acid (proportionate) composition of plasma and erythrocyte phosphatidylcholine was determined in 30 patients (10.3–17.0 years) stratified into active and quiescent Crohn's disease (paediatric Crohn's disease activity index) and high and low body mass (body mass index centile).
Results: In plasma phosphatidylcholine, active disease activity was associated with a lower level of ?-linolenic acid compared with that in quiescent disease (P < 0.05). A body mass index below the 50th centile was associated with active Crohn's disease, low linoleic and ?-linolenic acids and high arachidonic acid (P < 0.05) in plasma phosphatidylcholine, and low ?-linolenic acid in erythrocyte phosphatidylcholine. These findings could not be explained through differences in habitual dietary fat intake.
Conclusion: In paediatric Crohn's disease, a low body mass index centile and high disease activity are associated with altered profiles of essential fatty acids and their derivatives, which may reflect altered metabolic demand.
0269-2813
433-442
Trebble, T.M.
6fe25566-584d-48fb-8ba2-1b961c9b5e9f
Wootton, S.A.
bf47ef35-0b33-4edb-a2b0-ceda5c475c0c
May, A.
9829296a-561a-49e5-a78b-b4cfad7f5ca1
Erlewyn-Lajeunesse, M.D.S.
ec8fdf10-d80b-4309-bec8-9ba5be5bb6ed
Chakraborty, A.
de29bd52-9e84-400d-ab1f-3d41f9888c24
Mullee, M.A.
fd3f91c3-5e95-4f56-8d73-260824eeb362
Stroud, M.A.
1665ae65-0898-4848-bf0d-baec8f2bb078
Beattie, R.M.
977a2f68-2bcf-4436-87e7-28a39952adda
Trebble, T.M.
6fe25566-584d-48fb-8ba2-1b961c9b5e9f
Wootton, S.A.
bf47ef35-0b33-4edb-a2b0-ceda5c475c0c
May, A.
9829296a-561a-49e5-a78b-b4cfad7f5ca1
Erlewyn-Lajeunesse, M.D.S.
ec8fdf10-d80b-4309-bec8-9ba5be5bb6ed
Chakraborty, A.
de29bd52-9e84-400d-ab1f-3d41f9888c24
Mullee, M.A.
fd3f91c3-5e95-4f56-8d73-260824eeb362
Stroud, M.A.
1665ae65-0898-4848-bf0d-baec8f2bb078
Beattie, R.M.
977a2f68-2bcf-4436-87e7-28a39952adda

Trebble, T.M., Wootton, S.A., May, A., Erlewyn-Lajeunesse, M.D.S., Chakraborty, A., Mullee, M.A., Stroud, M.A. and Beattie, R.M. (2003) Essential fatty acid status in paediatric Crohn's disease: relationship with disease activity and nutritional status. Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics, 18 (4), 433-442. (doi:10.1046/j.1365-2036.2003.01707.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Active paediatric Crohn's disease is associated with nutritional deficiencies and altered nutrient intake. The availability of essential fatty acids (linoleic and ?-linolenic acids) or their derivatives (arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids) may alter in plasma and cell membrane phospholipid in protein-energy malnutrition in children and in Crohn's disease in adults.
Aim: To investigate the relationship of fatty acid phospholipid profiles with disease activity and nutritional status in paediatric Crohn's disease.
Methods: The fatty acid (proportionate) composition of plasma and erythrocyte phosphatidylcholine was determined in 30 patients (10.3–17.0 years) stratified into active and quiescent Crohn's disease (paediatric Crohn's disease activity index) and high and low body mass (body mass index centile).
Results: In plasma phosphatidylcholine, active disease activity was associated with a lower level of ?-linolenic acid compared with that in quiescent disease (P < 0.05). A body mass index below the 50th centile was associated with active Crohn's disease, low linoleic and ?-linolenic acids and high arachidonic acid (P < 0.05) in plasma phosphatidylcholine, and low ?-linolenic acid in erythrocyte phosphatidylcholine. These findings could not be explained through differences in habitual dietary fat intake.
Conclusion: In paediatric Crohn's disease, a low body mass index centile and high disease activity are associated with altered profiles of essential fatty acids and their derivatives, which may reflect altered metabolic demand.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: 2003

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 26040
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/26040
ISSN: 0269-2813
PURE UUID: 6883b46e-185b-4247-b034-ba1282259ab6

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Apr 2006
Last modified: 08 Jan 2022 09:55

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: T.M. Trebble
Author: S.A. Wootton
Author: A. May
Author: M.D.S. Erlewyn-Lajeunesse
Author: A. Chakraborty
Author: M.A. Mullee
Author: M.A. Stroud
Author: R.M. Beattie

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×