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Molecular Information Technology

Molecular Information Technology
Molecular Information Technology
Molecular materials are endowed with unique properties of unrivaled potential for high density integration of computing systems. Present applications of molecules range from organic semiconductor materials for low-cost circuits to genetically modified proteins for commercial imaging equipment. To fully realize the potential of molecules in computation, information processing concepts that relinquish narrow prescriptive control over elementary structures and functions are needed, and self-organizing architectures have to be developed. Investigations into qualitatively new concepts of information processing are underway in the areas of reaction-diffusion computing, self-assembly computing, and conformation-based computing. Molecular computing is best considered not as a competitor for conventional computing, but as an opportunity for new applications. Microrobotics and bioimmersive computing are among the domains likely to benefit from advances in molecular computing. Progress will depend on both novel computing concepts and innovations in materials. This article reviews current directions in the use of bulk and single molecules for information processing.
polymer electronics, molecular switches, self-assembly computing, conformation-based computation, self-organizing materials, bioimmersive computing
33-69
Zauner, Klaus-Peter
c8b22dbd-10e6-43d8-813b-0766f985cc97
Zauner, Klaus-Peter
c8b22dbd-10e6-43d8-813b-0766f985cc97

Zauner, Klaus-Peter (2005) Molecular Information Technology. Critical Reviews in Solid State and Material Sciences, 30 (1), 33-69. (doi:10.1080/10408430590918387).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Molecular materials are endowed with unique properties of unrivaled potential for high density integration of computing systems. Present applications of molecules range from organic semiconductor materials for low-cost circuits to genetically modified proteins for commercial imaging equipment. To fully realize the potential of molecules in computation, information processing concepts that relinquish narrow prescriptive control over elementary structures and functions are needed, and self-organizing architectures have to be developed. Investigations into qualitatively new concepts of information processing are underway in the areas of reaction-diffusion computing, self-assembly computing, and conformation-based computing. Molecular computing is best considered not as a competitor for conventional computing, but as an opportunity for new applications. Microrobotics and bioimmersive computing are among the domains likely to benefit from advances in molecular computing. Progress will depend on both novel computing concepts and innovations in materials. This article reviews current directions in the use of bulk and single molecules for information processing.

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Published date: March 2005
Keywords: polymer electronics, molecular switches, self-assembly computing, conformation-based computation, self-organizing materials, bioimmersive computing
Organisations: Agents, Interactions & Complexity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 260408
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/260408
PURE UUID: ec62913e-66b5-4dd0-9466-c04e06722e04

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Date deposited: 15 Apr 2005
Last modified: 16 Dec 2019 20:44

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Contributors

Author: Klaus-Peter Zauner

University divisions

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