The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Use of volatile additives to increase the antimicrobial efficacy of a corona discharge

Use of volatile additives to increase the antimicrobial efficacy of a corona discharge
Use of volatile additives to increase the antimicrobial efficacy of a corona discharge
The antimicrobial effects of charged reactive ion species produced by cold plasma discharges are well recognized. Total sterilization can be achieved on media in close proximity to the plasma source (1). The aim of this research was to investigate whether the antimicrobial efficacy of a corona discharge could be improved by the use of antimicrobial volatile additives in the gas mixture of the discharge. Volatile compounds known to have good antimicrobial effects, such as ethyl alcohol, cinnamon oil and the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree oil) were evaporated into the air around the ground electrode of a point-to-grid geometry corona discharge. Testing against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in enclosed booths showed that the use of some antimicrobial volatile additives, such as ethyl alcohol and cinnamon oil, can significantly increase the bactericidal effects of a corona discharge. In the case of tea tree oil, however, the reaction with the ionic species produced in a corona discharge seems to lower the antimicrobial activity. Our results suggest that the use of some volatile additive can increase the antimicrobial effects of a corona discharge.
Non-thermal plasma, corona, bacteria, essential oil
4-916140-07-9
273-280
GAUNT, L F
8f1ddc70-cc59-4bb0-8fe9-313a855c8a17
HUGHES, J F
d6a276c8-a7e5-46d9-9b3a-e7be07d4ddfc
Oda, T
e4272d23-5bab-4e76-b9be-0bb6389cc3c3
GAUNT, L F
8f1ddc70-cc59-4bb0-8fe9-313a855c8a17
HUGHES, J F
d6a276c8-a7e5-46d9-9b3a-e7be07d4ddfc
Oda, T
e4272d23-5bab-4e76-b9be-0bb6389cc3c3

GAUNT, L F and HUGHES, J F (2004) Use of volatile additives to increase the antimicrobial efficacy of a corona discharge. Oda, T (ed.) IEJ-ESA Joint Symposium on Electrostatics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. 07 - 10 Nov 2004. pp. 273-280 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

The antimicrobial effects of charged reactive ion species produced by cold plasma discharges are well recognized. Total sterilization can be achieved on media in close proximity to the plasma source (1). The aim of this research was to investigate whether the antimicrobial efficacy of a corona discharge could be improved by the use of antimicrobial volatile additives in the gas mixture of the discharge. Volatile compounds known to have good antimicrobial effects, such as ethyl alcohol, cinnamon oil and the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree oil) were evaporated into the air around the ground electrode of a point-to-grid geometry corona discharge. Testing against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in enclosed booths showed that the use of some antimicrobial volatile additives, such as ethyl alcohol and cinnamon oil, can significantly increase the bactericidal effects of a corona discharge. In the case of tea tree oil, however, the reaction with the ionic species produced in a corona discharge seems to lower the antimicrobial activity. Our results suggest that the use of some volatile additive can increase the antimicrobial effects of a corona discharge.

Slideshow
Dr_Gaunt.ppt - Other
Download (1MB)

More information

Published date: 2004
Additional Information: Event Dates: 7-10 November 2004
Venue - Dates: IEJ-ESA Joint Symposium on Electrostatics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, 2004-11-07 - 2004-11-10
Keywords: Non-thermal plasma, corona, bacteria, essential oil
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 260612
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/260612
ISBN: 4-916140-07-9
PURE UUID: 1b9c4567-a4ab-44ed-98c6-d86a26cfd00f

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 02 Mar 2005
Last modified: 29 Jan 2020 15:41

Export record

Contributors

Author: L F GAUNT
Author: J F HUGHES
Editor: T Oda

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×