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Information Science Meets the Material World

Information Science Meets the Material World
Information Science Meets the Material World
Current material science is very limited in its ability to organise matter in detail. We lack the capability to create extended heterogenous nanostructures. Nevertheless, such structures can feasibly be fabricated as is exemplified by living matter and its constituents. To break this long-standing limitation and to extend material science and engineering into the realm for complex heterogenous systems, fundamentally new approaches for the design of materials are required. To implement nano-structured systems at a time scale that does not increase proportional with component count, it will be necessary to endow material building blocks with the competency to self-organise. This implies moving away from external control and towards the embedding of information processes into molecular building blocks. Engineering in this domain faces the challenge of intrinsic context sensitivity---simple rules do not apply. The predictability of design decisions that underlies human creative engineering breaks down in the face of the complex component interactions. Computational science is essential for overcoming this hurdle. On-line modelling and simulation need to resurrect predictability to enable the conception and design of complex organised matter. In addtion, search methods that can explore combinatorial design spaces in a practical time would be desirable.
Zauner, K.-P.
c8b22dbd-10e6-43d8-813b-0766f985cc97
Zauner, K.-P.
c8b22dbd-10e6-43d8-813b-0766f985cc97

Zauner, K.-P. (2005) Information Science Meets the Material World. Towards 2020 Science, Venice. 29 Jun - 01 Jul 2005.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Current material science is very limited in its ability to organise matter in detail. We lack the capability to create extended heterogenous nanostructures. Nevertheless, such structures can feasibly be fabricated as is exemplified by living matter and its constituents. To break this long-standing limitation and to extend material science and engineering into the realm for complex heterogenous systems, fundamentally new approaches for the design of materials are required. To implement nano-structured systems at a time scale that does not increase proportional with component count, it will be necessary to endow material building blocks with the competency to self-organise. This implies moving away from external control and towards the embedding of information processes into molecular building blocks. Engineering in this domain faces the challenge of intrinsic context sensitivity---simple rules do not apply. The predictability of design decisions that underlies human creative engineering breaks down in the face of the complex component interactions. Computational science is essential for overcoming this hurdle. On-line modelling and simulation need to resurrect predictability to enable the conception and design of complex organised matter. In addtion, search methods that can explore combinatorial design spaces in a practical time would be desirable.

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More information

Published date: 2005
Additional Information: Event Dates: 30 June - 2 July 2005
Venue - Dates: Towards 2020 Science, Venice, 2005-06-29 - 2005-07-01
Organisations: Agents, Interactions & Complexity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 261893
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/261893
PURE UUID: 11bdad34-b6c4-4d0d-b261-6c866277d0ec

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Feb 2006
Last modified: 24 Jun 2020 16:39

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Contributors

Author: K.-P. Zauner

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